Archive for art

Meredith Yayanos

Posted in art, film, interviews, music, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2013 by intoviews

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What is your name?
O HAI! I’m Meredith Yayanos. How are YOU?

How would you describe what you do?
Lots of music, words, and imagery. Most of the stuff I make and do ends up being conversational and collaborative in nature. From 2007 – 2012, I was devoted to an online/print venture called Coilhouse Magazine with co-founding creator, publisher and partner Nadya Lev, as well as many other wonderful weirdos. It was, and remains, “A Love Letter to Alternative Culture”. The project’s on hiatus for now, but <CHEERFULPLUG> you can download all six of our print issues as free PDFs at the archival website, and the blog also contains thousands of entries on a wide variety weird and beautiful and funny topics. </CHEERFULPLUG> These days, I’ve gone back to making music pretty much full time; I play violin and theremin and sing. Score films. Oh! And recently I’ve started dabbling in making pretentious artsy fartsy films of my own. That’s been fun.

What are you currently working on?
I’m finishing up the final leg of production of an album of “haunted chamber music” by The Parlour Trick, my duo with fellow multi-instrumentalist Dan Cantrell. Ghostly, modern classical/aggro-ambient instrumentals. Piano, violin, theremin, musical saw, witchy vocals, harpsichord, celeste, pump organ, electronics, etc. Right now the project’s badass designer, Star St. Germain (who also worked on Coilhouse!) and I are sussing out all of the packaging for the Parlour Trick CDs and vinyl, which should hopefully go to press and be available for sale shortly. Meantime, on my lonesome, I’m devoting the bulk of my time to various aspects of reward fulfillment for the hundreds of Kickstarter backers who chipped in to get the album and related materials funded. (Any of you guys reading? You know who you are! HAY. I LURVE YOO. SORRY IT’S TAKING SO LONG.) You can buy the music digitally on Bandcamp. I’m also about to shoot a second Parlour Trick music video in New Zealand with my sweetheart, Madeleine Ledespencer, and a bunch of amazing folks we know from the Weta / Wellywood film industry. I seriously have no idea WTF I’m doing, yet. But I’m excited!

What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
Oof… I guess it’d be that lot of people think I’m an extrovert. I’m really not. Actually, I’m an extremely shy, anxious person. Always have been. I started performing on stages in front of people when I was five. Then and now, I’m terrified of crowds and exposure. You’re basically talking to an introvert who, at some point, somehow managed to convince herself and everyone else otherwise by developing halfway-adequate social skills. (Related: I’ve had a solo music project in the works called “The Ever Present Tense” for well over fifteen years now. It’s like this hideously sparkly paste-jewel-encrusted lithopedion baby cataloging my various neuroses, including GAD, PTSD, and BDD. Woohooo, partaaaay. Sure to be an instant classic.)962839_10201112870372994_1252226957_n

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
The allure of wordplay, yum yum. There’s that delicious brainmeat frission that happens when you read or craft just the right turn of phrase. But the medium has its weaknesses, too, in that words… well, they fail. A lot. Words fail me every day. All the time. Because they put me at a remove from more atavistic sensations, connections, communications. Which is why I love music so much– the ribcage-expanding, gut-and-capillary level reaction it can trigger. Music is my magick. Also, the visual resonance of art and design: when I lean both my body and my brain into a piece of music… I see landscapes and I feel textures. And then that’s when the most unfailing words come– stories that have steeped in sounds and images.

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
Immensely. In too many ways to count. Coilhouse Magazine couldn’t have existed without the global network we all built together online, and the kinship that sprang up from it. More generally, I’d say that many of the most wonderful collaborators I’ve worked with, across multiple mediums, are thanks to BBSs and chat rooms, and later on, social networking sites like Livejournal, Twitter, Tumblr. Every day, no matter where I am in the world, I can interface with authors, fashion photographers, editors, musicians, and filmmakers… all thousands of miles away. With a good pair of headphones and an Apogee One, I can (and have) recorded full-length film scores on my laptop in the midst of traveling internationally. I’m about to email this interview to you while I’m at ten-thousand feet in an airplane. I have cherished loved ones that I’ve never met face to face, and it’s a non-issue, because we’ve found ways to share our art. This world, and my subsequent work, is largely post-geographical, and I find that miraculous.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
The world can be brutal and unyielding. Please don’t let that take your luminosity away. Stay open. Stay kind. Stay grateful. Cherish yourself and cherish your loved ones. It’s good to be gentle, and it’s okay to yield. Do not be afraid to work veryveryeveryhard for a longlonglongtime on whatever it is that you love without receiving any validation or reassurance from outside sources. Just enjoy the adventure and rise to meet the challenge of the work itself. Don’t waste time worrying about what anyone else is going to think about the work you do, because it’s really none of your business. Most importantly, stop waiting for someone else to give you permission to be who you want to be, or to do what you dream of doing. And finally… regret is okay, and remorse is often warranted. But shame? Shame is bullshit. Shame is a colossal waste of life, so please, PLEASE work to find ways to regularly unpack whatever shame you have accrued. Pull it out of yourself, somehow, and burn it. Dance around that fire until it dies down, and then walk away.

Where can we find you online?
http://theparlourtrick.bandcamp.com/
twitter.com/theremina
theremina.tumblr.com/

What are you reading at the moment?
If music is my magick, then reading is my ritual! “The John Varley Reader” (a great collection of his short stories spanning thirty years), “Gun Machine” by Warren Ellis (relentlessly badass), “The People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Barraclough, Wendy Cheng, and Laura Pulido (highly recommended for anyone who’s curious about the invisible underpinnings of that city, both structurally and culturally) Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 (gobsmacking!), and, most affectingly, the first 200 pages of a novel-in-progress by a very brilliant friend. Re-reading, actually, multiple times a month, as the working draft evolves. Watching this story grow from the ground up is easily one of the most spellbinding and nourishing experiences I’ve ever had, or ever will.

What are you listening to at the moment?
On heavy rotation this week: Sun Ra’s “Space is the Place”, Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 In E Minor (Kalichstein Laredo Robinson Trio recording), Sibylle Baier, Gazelle Twin, K. Flay, Cabaret Voltaire, Miles Davis’ “Bitches Brew”, Goblin, Clint Mansell’s score for “Stoker”.

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Anything else we should know?
Yes. Please, please support the artists who make the songs and stories and pictures and dance and theatre that move you. If you appreciate their art, and you can afford to do so, please *buy* that art. But even if you can’t afford to buy their work, then talk about it, share it, celebrate it in some fashion that respects and values the artist as well as the art. Give them credit. Say their names.

Hannah Dostine

Posted in art, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2013 by intoviews

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What is your name?
As a creative polymath, I go as HRD (pronounced, ‘heard’) but am usually known as the zinemaker, Hannah Rose Dostine and am slowly introducing the name, Hans Vega.

How would you describe what you do?
As an assortment and overlap of self-made projects, zinemaking, drawing, beatnik writings and daydreaming with an edge of sustainable and ethical activism…or something like that :)

What are you currently working on?
I’m preparing for the Canberra Zine Emporium :)

What has had the greatest influence on your work?
Definitely my ambiguous mental health. But also my imagination, hands down.

What is the greatest misconception about you and your work?
The way I come across I always worry is disinterested, awkward and as a social face a bit wobbly and hardly around (but i hope people know how much i appreciate them) I feel that hinders or could be seen in my work. Otherwise if anything I think what i convey through personal symbols may be ambiguous/misunderstood, but my subject matter is also a life struggle that I find difficult to express.

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
I am still developing and experimenting but I have become comfortable with fineliner. I find its saturating effect great to convey my theme. As for weakness, merely educating myself with the mediums potential!

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
Immensely amd positively in the way that the internet has opened up a plethora of artistic and creative communities and collectives to learn from, receive support, feedback and be inspired by.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Question everything, believe in no end to your creativity and always be yourself.

Where can we find you online?
I am around on facebook and twitter but for my main work, head over to tumblr: chasehotairballoons.tumblr.com or we make zines if you do trades.

What are you reading at the moment?
A zine about living an adventurous life on zero dollars a day!

What are you listenning to at the moment?
Bands of the Punk, Rock and Jazz persuasions (e.g. NOFX, Jaco Pastorious and Jimi Hendrix).

Anything else we should know?
I volunteer at Sticky Institute, Melbourne’s shop for zine crusaders and DIY enthusiasts, a brilliant and fun group of people.

Dustin Weaver

Posted in art, comics, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , , on April 6, 2013 by intoviews

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what is your name?

My name is Dustin Paul Weaver.

how would you describe what you do?

I draw comic books, which is comparable to being a film director, I think. Like a director, a comic artist works from a script and
determines how to tell this story in a visual medium. The big difference is that where a director brings in a lot of other people–
actors, cinematographer, story boarders, set designers, etc.– a comic book artist does most of it alone. I’m the set designer, the costume designer, and all of the actors, and I’m choosing the shots, handling the lighting, and doing all the special effects.

On top off all that, a comic book artist can employ techniques used in painting and illustration, from the abstract to the realistic, to
create something visually engaging.

what are you currently working on?

I’m currently the cover artist on Avengers for Marvel comics, and I’m working on a 3-issue story arc that will be published in Avengers
#7-9.

In my “spare time” I’m slowly chipping away at a comic that I am writing and drawing. I’m planning on releasing it for free online, in
weekly installments starting ether in the summer or fall of 2013.
what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The greatest influence on my work is my friendship with fellow comic book creator, D.J. Bryant. He’s a very smart guy with good taste. Many of the books that I’ve really loved and been inspired by I’ve read at his recommendation. And when I’m creating something, whether or not I think it’s something D.J. would like is something I think about.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Maybe it’s that I LIKE drawing buildings or that I LIKE drawing a lot of detail. I don’t “like” drawing these things so much as I like drawings OF these things. If you think drawing hundreds of little windows on buildings is fun for anyone, you’re mistaken. But when the
result is a fully realized city-scape, or a car engine, or what ever else has a lot of detail, and it comes out just as you imagined it,
the reward of having done it is great. I’m just trying to create something that I would like. Most of the time doing that is hard work.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Comic books are visual. They can grab a reader’s attention and provide a similar accessibility to that of movies and TV. But, going back to the first question, unlike movies and TV, comic books are created by a very small group of people and in many cases just one person. In this way they are more like literature in that there is a lot of creative freedom.

Comics also have the ability to use the strengths of both images and words, which makes them a powerful storytelling medium.
I think the biggest weakness this medium has is that the perception most people have of what comic books are and what they can be is still limited to the super-hero genre. Comic books can tell any kind of story. It needs the general audience to recognize that and be open to it before it can really take off. If you’ve never read a comic (or graphic novel– same thing) because you’re not interested in
super-heroes, maybe look a little deeper. I love comics. I’m almost always reading one, and it’s almost never a super-hero comic. (That
isn’t a slam on super-hero comics.)

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I guess I like doing things traditionally. I don’t use any 3d modelling or figure posing programs, and I don’t think I ever will. I
don’t do much digital drawing ether, though I’m not opposed to using digital tools and media for creating an image. I do do some clean up to my work in Photoshop but that’s about it.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

I struggle with the idea of giving advice. I think good advice for one person might not be good for another. If I imagine that I am giving
advice to myself, say ten years ago, I would say: Do things the way you want to do them. If someone tells you this is how to make comics and this is how to have a successful career, don’t listen. Don’t compare your work or your career to anyone else’s just because you think they must be doing it the right way. There is no right way, and everyone has their own trajectory. Like what you like. Do things the way you want to do them, and try to do them really really well.

Again, I don’t think this advice is for everyone.
where can we find you online?

I have a blog at http://dustinweaver.blogspot.com

And if you want to see my art but don’t want to read my rambling stupidity, I have a tumblr at http://dustinweaver.tumblr.com/

what are you reading at the moment?

I’m reading the first Jaime Hernandez Love and Rockets book, “Maggie the Mechanic”. So many people love this stuff, I figured it was time I found out what all the fuss is about. I’m not that far into it. I’m excited to see how it evolves.

I’m also reading Kafka’s “The Castle” and I’m loving it. Very inspiring.

I recently finished Osamu Tezuka’s “Barbara” and I really enjoyed it. He’s the best.

I’m getting Brandon Graham’s “Multiple Warheads” and James Stokoe’s “Godzilla- The Half-Century War” whenever a new issue comes out.

Oh and this may seem silly, but I’m reading the manga version of “Return Of The Jedi” by Shin-Ichi Hiromoto. It’s just an adaptation of
the film, but the things Hiromoto does with page layouts are so great. He puts so much drama and life and FUN into it. This is work not to be dismissed.

what are you listening to at the moment?

The albums that I have in heavy rotation right now are Blonde Redhead’s “23”, Brian Eno’s “Before And After Science”, Broadcast’s
“The Future Crayon”, Crystal Stilts’ “Alight of Night”, David Bowie’s “Low”, Ennio Morricone’s soundtrack to “Il Grande Silenzio”, and the
latest Guided By Voices album (I think. I can hardly keep up with Pollard’s productivity.)

anything else we should know?

I can’t think of anything.

Wendy Collin Sorin

Posted in art, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , on June 15, 2011 by intoviews

what is your name?

wendy collin sorrin

how would you describe what you do?
I’m a visual artist who works mainly in drawing and collage. I like to build grids, webs, and networks.

what are you currently working on?
Collaged neon fields composed of deconstructed mailing labels.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Travel, poetry, texts (English and German), computer boards, found objects, migraine headaches.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
I haven’t heard any though I don’t doubt there might be a misconception from time to time.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
Simple, direct, portable, toxin-free. This works well as a lifestyle choice, too. As for weaknesses? Too low-tech, maybe, for 21st century tastes though in my film work, my drawings are digitized and three-dimensionalized and set in motion by others.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
My son is a professor of computer architecture at Duke. His research, the images he’s shared with me as well as my own investigations into the visuals of chips and boards has been like peering into another universe.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Rainer Maria Rilke, in his Letters to a Young Poet, wrote to the young Kappus: Ask yourself this: must I write? My former lithography professor, Michael Sean Holihan, used to say: Ya gotta do what ya gotta do. Less poetic, but no less profound.

where can we find you online?
At my website:   www.wendycollinsorin.com  and facebook.

what are you reading at the moment?
Dog Stories by James Herriott.

what are you listening to at the moment?
Progressive talk radio. I’m a political junkie, a proud Lefty and a devotee of Thom Hartmann.

anything else we should know?
I was fortunate that my parents believed in my art and supported me with art classes and supplies. (When my junior high school guidance counselor gave me a fire-and-brimstone lecture about art not being a career choice, I was strong enough to find it more humorous than threatening.) That financial and emotional support continues to this day by my husband of 41 years who cheered me on and paid the tuition when I went to college at age 36. My time at the Cleveland Institute of Art was transformative; my professors opened my mind and expanded my worldview. I still hear those head tapes in my studio every day.

bill ross

Posted in art, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , , on May 15, 2011 by intoviews

How would you describe what you do?
I see myself as a sort of confessional artist/painter.   I describe what I do as “slap stick surrealism”.   An artist writer friend, Matt Morris said my work takes the viewer to a place where birdbaths are terrifying.  This is what I want to do.  I strive for an overall weird intensity in my work.  I don’t know how else to explain it.  I draw from my childhood mostly, hence the confessional piece, and I try to create absurdly intense imagery using cakes, animals, giant trees, appliances, water towers and occasional bird baths all in bright concussion color.

What am I working on now?
It is a busy spring.  Tomorrow night 4-29-11 we are opening a show called 2+2=5 at Thunder-Sky Inc.  A nonprofit Gallery I help to run.  I have a number of collaborations in this show with some other great artists from the Cincinnati area. Check it out at www.thunderskyinc.org.  I just had a large show of my work at The Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center.  The show was called “The Art of Food”.  I am currently working on a couple of collaborative pieces with artist Drew Kidd for a show called “Superwhat?” that will open June 25th at Greenwich Gallery.  I am also very excited that I will have work in the June show at U-turn Gallery here in Cincinnati in a small arts district known as Brighton.  My partner Keith and I are also preparing for a Thunder-Sky Inc exhibit at Howard Finster’s “Paradise Gardens” near Athens GA. in the middle of May.

What have been the greatest influences on my work?
I would be lying if I didn’t say first and foremost Keith Banner.  He is an amazing writer and visual artist as well as a creative thinker and I am happy to say we have been together for 21 years as a couple.   But besides Keith as far as visual artists go, I would say Max Ernst is the artist I find myself going back to as well as Thomas Hart Benton and Ed  Keinholtz.  I also draw from the confessional poets Ann Sexton, Sylvia Plath and Theodore Roethke.  My favorite poem right now is “The Lost Son”.  It is truly amazing!

What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
I am not sure if there are too many misconceptions about my work.  I think people either really get it and love it or they don’t get it and disregard it and that is fine with me.  It truly makes me happy though when people like what I do and I am thrilled when people actually want to buy my work.  As for myself, Rupaul says “What other people think or say about me is none of my concern”.  I love this little piece of sanity

What do you see as the main strengths and weakness of my work?
I have been told I have an obviously recognizable style.  In my solo work I tell people I am basically painting the same painting over and over again no matter how hard I try to do something different.   I have realized this is probably a good thing.  However for me it gets harder and harder to try to figure out new ways to make it interesting both for myself and for the viewer.  With having an easily recognizable style you can quickly get pigeon holed.  So I try to break free from this by working collaboratively with other artists as much as I can.  Through collaborating I can pull my head out of my ass so speak and do something truly new that wouldn’t exist without the other artist or artists.

How has technology impacted upon your work?
Technology has not affected how I create work.   I do everything by hand.  I don’t even use power tools when I am building panels or framing etc.  I like the feel of using a hand saw, hammer and nails etc.  However, Facebook has done wonders for me in getting my work out into the world.  Shortly after posting a few piece on my fb page last year I was offered a show at a gallery I truly respect called 1305 Gallery.  This led to another show and another.  After my Dad died in Jan 2008 I had pretty much stopped painting my own projects altogether. Once I was offered a show I started painting again.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Give it all you got!!!  Seriously!  If there is something you really want to accomplish you have got to put your whole heart into it.  This is the only way to figure out your own strengths and weakness.  All lessons that are meaningful are learned the hard way.  Besides being a social worker for people with disabilities I also co-founded a studio for people with disabilities here in Cincinnati called Visionaries and Voices.  I am proud of what I created.  The experience also helped me to understand what I needed to do and what not to do with the next project, Thunder-Sky Inc. because I truly gave what had to give, basically until it hurt.   I now know to control what I can and let go what I can’t.

Where can we find you on line?
It’s weird I know, but I don’t have a website of my work.  I just never thought about it.   You can see my work on my Facebook page and on www.thunderskyinc.org also the 2+2=5 blog through Thunder-Sky site.

What are you reading?
Sad to say but I don’t read as much as I would like.  I am just to ADD I suppose.  Besides the poets I love that I already mentioned, I am reading David Sedaris’ “Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk” I want to read “God Is Not Great” by Christopher Hitchens, when I can find time.

What are you listening to at the moment?
My music mood is dictated by the season.  Being that it is spring I have in the C/D changer “Fragile” by 9 Inch Nails, Nina Simone’s “Greatest Hits”, Kanye West new disk, Grizzly Bear and “The Shepherd’s Dog” by Iron and Wine.  I still love the new one by Interpol as well. I just played it too much.

Anything else we need to know?
Check out Thunder-Sky Inc. either on facebook or at http://www.thunderskyinc.org learn a little bit about Raymond Thunder-Sky and what Keith and I do.

Kathy Polenberg

Posted in art, interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2011 by intoviews

What is your name?

Kathy Polenberg

How would you describe what you do?

It is communication in the overlapping and ever-evolving vocabularies and mediums of creative expression: writing, painting, craft etc.

What are you currently working on?

Right now I’m involved in theatrical scenic art and set painting, focusing on creating activities which can demonstrate stagecraft to kids, and allow some hands-on experience. An ongoing project at home is a series of abstract watercolors I am doing in response to a series of subjective photographs by my husband. It’s somewhat premeditated – we chose local places to go with the camera (some maybe only a block away) but he framed and shot subjects that I didn’t paint a response to until he made his prints. So my part is from memory of our field trips, and spontaneous reaction to the prints. None of our images for this series, which we will show side-by-side (married), are more than 6 months old (though we’ve been married 30 years.)

What has had the greatest influence on your work?

Sunlight and memory.

What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

That it is not informed by you and your behavior and your communication when it reaches me.

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Marketing and the abbreviation of our culture, our communal experience, our present, and our history. We are steeped in evaporation, and that makes a weak tea.

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Not too much- all my working parts are original to this body.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Intend good and recycle the evidence.

Where can we find you online?

For now I’m on face book and archived at a bunch of lit mags. I’d rather you find me on the porch.

What are you reading at the moment?

A list of questions from Paul Grimsley. I like to reread Louise Erdrich and Barbara Kingsolver in the summer.

What are you listening to at the moment?

I’m in the yard so there’s the neighborhood comings and goings, and there’s this mockingbird in the holly tree with a 12-song set list so far.

Anything else we should know?

Not crazy about “should.”

alfred eaker

Posted in art, film, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 29, 2011 by intoviews

annunciation

stations 6

what is your name?

Alfred Eaker

how would you describe what you do?

I am an expressionist painter, filmmaker, performance artist. Additionally, I write film criticism and theological essays. I am currently working on my Masters of Theological Studies in the Arts.

what are you currently working on?

A surreal, existential film titled “Stations.” A series of paintings entitled ‘Stations” and a documentary film on artist Raymond Thundersky.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Possibly the music of Gustav Mahler and Luigi Nono. Also, my art professor Steve Mannheimer, the writings of Thomas Merton and Flannery O’Connor, the paintings of Paul Gauguin, the films of Tod Browning, Luis Bunuel, Andrei Tarkovsky and Charlie Chaplin.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

People tend to put you in a stereotypical box. “Oh, his work is abstract or surreal, etc.” The assumption is that you “cannot” do something more linear, narrative, etc. I started off as a quasi-linear artist. People tend to assume that once you have done “abstract” work, then that is all you will ever do. Journeyed art is never linear in path. Picasso certainly tightened after his Cubist phase. Too, for some reason, people who saw my first feature, “Jesus and her Gospel of Yes” that i was some kind of atheist. Far from it. The film itself echoes and expresses my own Zen Catholicism. Atheism, for me, tends as much towards totalitarianism as fundamentalism does.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

In painting I work exclusively in oils and would have it no other way. It is a vibrant, organic medium, but it is a solitary form of expression and work process. Film is reliant on collaboration, which is simultaneously exhilarating and frustrating.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

In painting, absolutely none! Film, of course, is reliant on technology, but it is not that I am hands on with the technology. I am still primarily a concept artists and delegate to those who have the technological skills because I am not in the slightest bit interested in the aesthetics of filmmaking.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Art is a vocation. Anything less is not art.

where can we find you online?

http://www.illuminationgallery.net/guests/eaker/eaker.html

http://www.wthemovie.com/

what are you reading at the moment?

“Sophia: The Hidden Christ of Thomas Merton.”

what are you listening to at the moment?

Julie London.

anything else we should know?
N/A

Harriet Grey

Posted in art, illustration, update with tags , , , , , , , , on April 21, 2011 by inndecks

what is your name?
harriet gray

how would you describe what you do?
a mixture of contemporary illustration, hand made products and crafted items

what are you currently working on?
Quite a few things actually, probably my main focus at the moment is getting my website finished I took the hard route and decided to make it myself by using online tutorials and books to teach myself dreamweaver, I’m quite proud of the results at the moment but i’m still learning. I have a few personal illustration projects on the go including helping a friend with his album cover, and am also developing some new products to add to my range of items for sale.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
I get a lot of my inspiration from nature and the human form, and generally the little random things that happen around me

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
when I say I’m an illustrator some people assume I draw cartoons

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
I really like the hand drawn/made element of my work and the delicate textures I can achieve with my pencil … one thing that really frustrates me sometimes is that my work never looks the same once it’s scanned in to the computer.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
I don’t really use much technology when making my work as most of it is hand drawn, I generally just use photoshop to clean my images up a little and to make them more screen friendly.
technology has certainly made self promotion a lot easier, I use social media sites which help to direct traffic to my work on the web.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Exercise fuels the mind!

Where can we find you online?
I have a blog where I post about my work, news and events : http://harrietgray.blogspot.com/
and also my soon to be completed website : http://www.harrietgray.co.uk/

what are you reading at the moment?
‘the c word’ by lisa lynch

what are you listening to at the moment?
I am a bit obsessed with Florence and the machine at the moment, or any random music that happens to be playing in the studio!

anything else we should know?
I am part of the creative network SOUPA which is full of lots of other talented folk, and we also have a shop … go take a look see …
http://www.soupa.co.uk/

http://www.soupa.bigcartel.com/

Ronald Martin Smith

Posted in art, interviews, music, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 15, 2010 by intoviews

Ronald Martin Smith

Ronald Martin Smith

what is your name?

Ronald Martin Smith.

how would you describe what you do?

I wouldn’t, which already pushes the limit.

what are you currently working on?

I’ve a long-term drawing project in the works – “rockheads” – pencil (primarily) & marker – on those yellow post-its that have saved the memory of the world! About or near 30,000 in boxes in various locations in our apartment. No curatorial solution breaking over the horizon. These pieces get done Monday-Friday at my desk at work – I commit seconds to a minute and fraction – breaking the job/work plane to evidence some altogether other world. This is a graphite-realized open-ended projection, producing an imaginary population – a quick-graph odyssey. It’s dedicated to Marcel Duchamp, who wouldn’t give a damn.

what has been the greatest influence on your work?

Being alive.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Thinking it has any consequence at all. I misread as much as possible, which exhausts the realm of possibility, without using it too much against ‘the rest of the night’.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I’ve also written a good bit of poetry – published in George Hitchcock’s kayak in the 1970s & 1980s. There’s a lot of writing connected to my life that is unpublished. I work in journals, legal pads, index cards – it’s been going on for years. I more or less avoid doing anything about it – I’m an opportunist, and I try to be as unconscious as I possibly can be. All subsequent to the poems that did get published – since being in New York City since 1984 – and then some! It may or may not emerge: poetry, prose, surpoetics. More specifically….

That’s the window of exposure to the poebizjunkie world that sucked the brains out of poetry production schedules worldwide. The medium is the medium. The artist, the poet, conducts what ever comes across with as little forgiveness as possible. Write a poem. Fine. Disseminate it? Wha? Make it have a shadow box to sleep in? I’d rather die in the heart of a neon squall. (Them Crooked Vultures on headphones). Strength and weakness neutralize each other. Without being ends of the selfsame continuum. I defy myself to express something. Commitment is largely a myth, and the time it takes to do something about it is irrelevant. The obstacle curse of existence doesn’t really appreciate the surreal onsurget that wants only to ring its bell. And I mean CLOCK IT!!!!

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Orwell didn’t write 1984 for nothing!

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

You’d better mean what you do or else take it somewhere else.

where can we find you online?

Now why would you want to do that!

what are you reading at the moment?

Nothing but the blank space ahead of each letter being typed.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Them Crooked Vultures.

anything else we should know?

At your own risk.

Carol Maric

Posted in art, interviews, music, news, photography, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2010 by intoviews

Carol Maric

Carol Maric

what is your name?

Carol Maric

how would you describe what you do?

“My life goal? Literary Immortality—without compromise.”

“I would rather be skydiving while writing a book”

“I am paradoxically precocious, belated, and posthumous.”

philosopher, polymath, writer, poet, musician, artist.

Author of the unpublished masterpiece PROTEAN NotUnTitled: The Philosophical Cantos (copyright 2000 Library of Congress), Carol Maric has presented the manuscript thus far to only a few, including Harold Bloom and Jacques Derrida, who had favorable comments. The work is akin to late James Joyce with Nietzschean poetics, highly baroque, and deeply complex in its content and language—an original extension of the English language, elucidating the ambiguities of various extremities of mind. This is the sort of book in which an author’s work might culminate, yet it is a first work.

Maric has since been writing a lengthy novel for several years, as well as another book of poetry, and essays; future works include books of philosophy, microfiction, and the (under construction) online literary journal Alidade Review.

She is also a multifaceted musician (electric cello, violin, and voice), and visual artist (photography, painting, and drawing).

what are you currently working on?

Philosophy.

I consider Philosophy to be the highest pursuit of the mind.

My independent study has been non-linear (within and across texts), primarily associative, and focused on a few great philosophers, along with other great literary writers and poets (why settle for anything less?), with whom I develop immediate affinities—I can feel their presence alive on the other side of every page I view and touch; I experience “discourse” with their minds as my thoughts immediately react to, and counteract theirs—imaginary debates and associative connections always ensue, during varying speeds of interaction ranging from slow, close, and deconstructive to mercurial, firestorming readings.

I am always studying everything and everybody around me, as my mind is never at rest, even while I sleep, although I experiment with transcendental meditation and biofeedback to explore stillness.

Having just completed the extensive project of familiarizing myself with the history of western philosophy, from its origins to the present, in order to broaden my base knowledge, in a linear manner, I am now about to go back through it all again in an even more comprehensive mode, in tandem with studying my favorite philosophers further, while writing philosophy.

I am founder and group leader of MySpace’s Philosophy / Critical Theory Group, one of the largest and flourishing public forums in the Science & History category, since 2004.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The greatest influence on my work was the death of my father, which caused me to emancipate myself at the age of 33.

I credit my father with teaching me how to write exceptionally.

Due to concurrent, life-altering events, I began a reassessment of my life and circumstances, and decided to radically change them. My introduction to the philosophical writings of Friedrich Nietzsche could not have been better timed or needed: his work became a life saving necessity and dark comfort in a raging tempest; it was then that I realized how important philosophy was to become to me, even though I had always been essentially a philosophical being, gestating and developing ideas over a long period of “undeclared” time.

I became actively autodidactic, as a voracious reader—and continue to be an enthusiastic advocate for the dissemination of knowledge through books.

Once I was acclimatized in my new environment, I started to seriously use the gifts that I had always possessed; after experiencing years of financial hardship and circumstances that severely constrained my freedoms during an singularly unconventional upbringing, my options continued to be narrow in my adult years until the breakthrough—I have not looked back since!

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

No one yet knows the magnitude and importance of my poetry.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I work in several mediums, just as I invent different styles within them, and find no strengths or weaknesses, but one’s own—relentless experimentation is absolutely essential!

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Dissemination as Revolution.

My stance on Writing & Publishing: No Editing Allowed, except one’s own volitionally (otherwise known as crafting), is an uncompromising stipulation of mine; It is either In or Out—Curators, Not Editors.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Develop an insatiable desire for knowledge, and feed it constantly!

where can we find you online?

PERSONAL:

www.myspace.com/carolmaric

www.facebook.com/carolmaric

www.groups.myspace.com/philosophycriticaltheory

www.twitter.com/carolmaric

www.linkedin.com/in/carolmaric

WRITING:

www.huffingtonpost.com/carol-maric

www.myartspace.com/zoominpage.do?imgpath=http://www.myartspace.com/repository/images/o/o1f9ofty29yxab32.jpg

www.cherrybleeds.com/words/guest1/carol-nov07.html

www.writerscafe.org/writers/Carol%20Maric/

www.ornerywoman.com

www.maricthinkpad.wordpress.com/

www.alidadereview.com

MUSIC:

www.myspace.com/damagedfranklin

www.myspace.com/212noiseorg

www.last.fm/user/mathgeekepii10

www.last.fm/group/Experimental+Vocalists

ART:

www.myartspace.com/carolmaric


what are you reading at the moment?

Too many books to mention: I usually read many, many hardcopy and digital books concurrently, kaleidoscopically shifting onward.

Some of my favorite philosophers and writers are Friedrich Nietzsche, Immanuel Kant, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Georges Bataille, Jacques Derrida, Willard Van Orman Quine, Karl Popper, Michel Foucault, Emil Cioran, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, Charles Baudelaire, T.S. Eliot, Dante Alighieri, Anne Rice, Antonin Artaud, Fyodor Dostoevsky, George Gordon Byron, Louis Zukofsky, Henry Miller, Vladimir Nabokov, Virginia Woolf, Henry James, Maurice Blanchot, Peter Handke, David Foster Wallace, Mark Z. Danielewski, John Berryman, Bryan Magee, and Blah3x^n—thus spake mathgeekepii10.

what are you listening to at the moment?

I am listening to the various sounds of my environment.

Philosophy lectures on my iPhone at iTunes University, a simply amazing educational project; and JM Roberts’ History of the World on my Zune, along with nonstop, multicrossgenremusic: classical, jazz, rock, experimental avant garde, noise, field recordings—anything and everything!

I have been particularly fascinated by Beck’s work, for several years now.


anything else we should know?

My Intellectual Inheritance:

Great Uncle: Leon Samson, who attended CCNY and Columbia, was an American Marxist social theorist of the 1930s, wrote the books The New Humanism, The American Mind: a Study In Socio-Analysis, and Toward a United Front: A Philosophy for American Workers. Samson is discussed in several books, papers and lectures by the political scientist Seymour Martin Lipset, and cited by numerous others in books and papers found primarily on Google Books.

Mother: Judith Greene is a criminal justice policy analyst who has been working in the field for nearly 40 years, and whose work is reflected in her many influential articles cited by major publications; her work is known both domestically and internationally.

Father: Joseph A. Greene attended NYU, became a teaching fellow at Michigan University at a young age, won a Hopwood award for poetry, acquired the English department’s first Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship, and was mentored by literary critic and author Austin Warren. Though he did not complete his dissertation, he continued as an assistant professor at a few colleges in MI, NJ and NY. He was a visual artist.

Coda: Maybe I will discuss my other work at another time here . . . Nice to meet you all.

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