Archive for the film Category

Meredith Yayanos

Posted in art, film, interviews, music, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2013 by intoviews

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What is your name?
O HAI! I’m Meredith Yayanos. How are YOU?

How would you describe what you do?
Lots of music, words, and imagery. Most of the stuff I make and do ends up being conversational and collaborative in nature. From 2007 – 2012, I was devoted to an online/print venture called Coilhouse Magazine with co-founding creator, publisher and partner Nadya Lev, as well as many other wonderful weirdos. It was, and remains, “A Love Letter to Alternative Culture”. The project’s on hiatus for now, but <CHEERFULPLUG> you can download all six of our print issues as free PDFs at the archival website, and the blog also contains thousands of entries on a wide variety weird and beautiful and funny topics. </CHEERFULPLUG> These days, I’ve gone back to making music pretty much full time; I play violin and theremin and sing. Score films. Oh! And recently I’ve started dabbling in making pretentious artsy fartsy films of my own. That’s been fun.

What are you currently working on?
I’m finishing up the final leg of production of an album of “haunted chamber music” by The Parlour Trick, my duo with fellow multi-instrumentalist Dan Cantrell. Ghostly, modern classical/aggro-ambient instrumentals. Piano, violin, theremin, musical saw, witchy vocals, harpsichord, celeste, pump organ, electronics, etc. Right now the project’s badass designer, Star St. Germain (who also worked on Coilhouse!) and I are sussing out all of the packaging for the Parlour Trick CDs and vinyl, which should hopefully go to press and be available for sale shortly. Meantime, on my lonesome, I’m devoting the bulk of my time to various aspects of reward fulfillment for the hundreds of Kickstarter backers who chipped in to get the album and related materials funded. (Any of you guys reading? You know who you are! HAY. I LURVE YOO. SORRY IT’S TAKING SO LONG.) You can buy the music digitally on Bandcamp. I’m also about to shoot a second Parlour Trick music video in New Zealand with my sweetheart, Madeleine Ledespencer, and a bunch of amazing folks we know from the Weta / Wellywood film industry. I seriously have no idea WTF I’m doing, yet. But I’m excited!

What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
Oof… I guess it’d be that lot of people think I’m an extrovert. I’m really not. Actually, I’m an extremely shy, anxious person. Always have been. I started performing on stages in front of people when I was five. Then and now, I’m terrified of crowds and exposure. You’re basically talking to an introvert who, at some point, somehow managed to convince herself and everyone else otherwise by developing halfway-adequate social skills. (Related: I’ve had a solo music project in the works called “The Ever Present Tense” for well over fifteen years now. It’s like this hideously sparkly paste-jewel-encrusted lithopedion baby cataloging my various neuroses, including GAD, PTSD, and BDD. Woohooo, partaaaay. Sure to be an instant classic.)962839_10201112870372994_1252226957_n

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
The allure of wordplay, yum yum. There’s that delicious brainmeat frission that happens when you read or craft just the right turn of phrase. But the medium has its weaknesses, too, in that words… well, they fail. A lot. Words fail me every day. All the time. Because they put me at a remove from more atavistic sensations, connections, communications. Which is why I love music so much– the ribcage-expanding, gut-and-capillary level reaction it can trigger. Music is my magick. Also, the visual resonance of art and design: when I lean both my body and my brain into a piece of music… I see landscapes and I feel textures. And then that’s when the most unfailing words come– stories that have steeped in sounds and images.

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
Immensely. In too many ways to count. Coilhouse Magazine couldn’t have existed without the global network we all built together online, and the kinship that sprang up from it. More generally, I’d say that many of the most wonderful collaborators I’ve worked with, across multiple mediums, are thanks to BBSs and chat rooms, and later on, social networking sites like Livejournal, Twitter, Tumblr. Every day, no matter where I am in the world, I can interface with authors, fashion photographers, editors, musicians, and filmmakers… all thousands of miles away. With a good pair of headphones and an Apogee One, I can (and have) recorded full-length film scores on my laptop in the midst of traveling internationally. I’m about to email this interview to you while I’m at ten-thousand feet in an airplane. I have cherished loved ones that I’ve never met face to face, and it’s a non-issue, because we’ve found ways to share our art. This world, and my subsequent work, is largely post-geographical, and I find that miraculous.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
The world can be brutal and unyielding. Please don’t let that take your luminosity away. Stay open. Stay kind. Stay grateful. Cherish yourself and cherish your loved ones. It’s good to be gentle, and it’s okay to yield. Do not be afraid to work veryveryeveryhard for a longlonglongtime on whatever it is that you love without receiving any validation or reassurance from outside sources. Just enjoy the adventure and rise to meet the challenge of the work itself. Don’t waste time worrying about what anyone else is going to think about the work you do, because it’s really none of your business. Most importantly, stop waiting for someone else to give you permission to be who you want to be, or to do what you dream of doing. And finally… regret is okay, and remorse is often warranted. But shame? Shame is bullshit. Shame is a colossal waste of life, so please, PLEASE work to find ways to regularly unpack whatever shame you have accrued. Pull it out of yourself, somehow, and burn it. Dance around that fire until it dies down, and then walk away.

Where can we find you online?
http://theparlourtrick.bandcamp.com/
twitter.com/theremina
theremina.tumblr.com/

What are you reading at the moment?
If music is my magick, then reading is my ritual! “The John Varley Reader” (a great collection of his short stories spanning thirty years), “Gun Machine” by Warren Ellis (relentlessly badass), “The People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Barraclough, Wendy Cheng, and Laura Pulido (highly recommended for anyone who’s curious about the invisible underpinnings of that city, both structurally and culturally) Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 (gobsmacking!), and, most affectingly, the first 200 pages of a novel-in-progress by a very brilliant friend. Re-reading, actually, multiple times a month, as the working draft evolves. Watching this story grow from the ground up is easily one of the most spellbinding and nourishing experiences I’ve ever had, or ever will.

What are you listening to at the moment?
On heavy rotation this week: Sun Ra’s “Space is the Place”, Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 In E Minor (Kalichstein Laredo Robinson Trio recording), Sibylle Baier, Gazelle Twin, K. Flay, Cabaret Voltaire, Miles Davis’ “Bitches Brew”, Goblin, Clint Mansell’s score for “Stoker”.

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Anything else we should know?
Yes. Please, please support the artists who make the songs and stories and pictures and dance and theatre that move you. If you appreciate their art, and you can afford to do so, please *buy* that art. But even if you can’t afford to buy their work, then talk about it, share it, celebrate it in some fashion that respects and values the artist as well as the art. Give them credit. Say their names.

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alfred eaker

Posted in art, film, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 29, 2011 by intoviews

annunciation

stations 6

what is your name?

Alfred Eaker

how would you describe what you do?

I am an expressionist painter, filmmaker, performance artist. Additionally, I write film criticism and theological essays. I am currently working on my Masters of Theological Studies in the Arts.

what are you currently working on?

A surreal, existential film titled “Stations.” A series of paintings entitled ‘Stations” and a documentary film on artist Raymond Thundersky.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Possibly the music of Gustav Mahler and Luigi Nono. Also, my art professor Steve Mannheimer, the writings of Thomas Merton and Flannery O’Connor, the paintings of Paul Gauguin, the films of Tod Browning, Luis Bunuel, Andrei Tarkovsky and Charlie Chaplin.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

People tend to put you in a stereotypical box. “Oh, his work is abstract or surreal, etc.” The assumption is that you “cannot” do something more linear, narrative, etc. I started off as a quasi-linear artist. People tend to assume that once you have done “abstract” work, then that is all you will ever do. Journeyed art is never linear in path. Picasso certainly tightened after his Cubist phase. Too, for some reason, people who saw my first feature, “Jesus and her Gospel of Yes” that i was some kind of atheist. Far from it. The film itself echoes and expresses my own Zen Catholicism. Atheism, for me, tends as much towards totalitarianism as fundamentalism does.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

In painting I work exclusively in oils and would have it no other way. It is a vibrant, organic medium, but it is a solitary form of expression and work process. Film is reliant on collaboration, which is simultaneously exhilarating and frustrating.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

In painting, absolutely none! Film, of course, is reliant on technology, but it is not that I am hands on with the technology. I am still primarily a concept artists and delegate to those who have the technological skills because I am not in the slightest bit interested in the aesthetics of filmmaking.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Art is a vocation. Anything less is not art.

where can we find you online?

http://www.illuminationgallery.net/guests/eaker/eaker.html

http://www.wthemovie.com/

what are you reading at the moment?

“Sophia: The Hidden Christ of Thomas Merton.”

what are you listening to at the moment?

Julie London.

anything else we should know?
N/A

timo vuorensola of Älymystö

Posted in film, interviews, music, news, update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2010 by intoviews

what is your name?
Timo Vuorensola

how would you describe what you do?
I’m a filmmaker, net overdoser and a noise musician

what are you currently working on?
i’m working on a feature film Iron Sky (www.ironsky.net), about Nazis from the Dark Side of the Moon. With my band Älymystö, we’ve just released a split with another band called And Then You Die, and are now starting planning our second full-length album.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

definitively David Lynch and David Bowie.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

that I do stuff for free just for fun. I don’t.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

In film, it’s mainly my ability to do quality stuff with small budgets. In music, I’m really not sure – I’m a big guy with a loud voice on stage, maybe that’s a strength.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Basically, it’s necessary to get my work done in all fields. The band and the film crews all live so widely across the world, it’s important for communication and collaboration.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

the art of compromising is not to compromise.

where can we find you online?

www.alymysto.com is my band
www.ironsky.net is my film
www.wreckamovie.com is my collaborative film production platform
www.zombieroom.net is mine and my girlfriend’s film blog
@LeonBlank is my Twitter username

what are you reading at the moment?
Ian Carr’s Miles Davis’ biography

what are you listening to at the moment?

Some random hotel lobby background music.

anything else we should know?

all these worlds belong to you, except europa. attempt no landings there.

Aria Alexandra

Posted in film, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , , , on January 12, 2010 by intoviews
Aria Alexander

Aria Alexandra

What is your name?

Elizabeth Aria Alexandra

How would you describe what you do?

I would say that I am an artist, primarily working in the medium of film. As an independent film maker I am able to have complete control over almost every aspect of my work, from the writing to the casting, direction and design. I love being my own editor and even compose a lot of the music. The beauty of film for me is that it combines almost every major art form into one and I can enjoy and appreciate all of them together.
What are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on the finishing touches for my short film “SPIDER” a neo-noir, crime-drama, which I’m very excited about and getting it ready for the film festival circuit. But as usual, I am also juggling multiple other projects. Right now this includes storyboarding a TV pilot, leading a local actors group, writing, writing and more writing… with some script consulting thrown in for good measure!

What has had the greatest influence on your work?

Without a doubt the greatest influence upon my work has been my experience of life, how I see and interpret both the good and the evil in the world, and the wisdom and inspiration I wish to pass on to others. I realize that my work is all that will be left of my life after I am gone, which gives me a great sense of perspective.
What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

The common misconception is that you as an artist are the same as your work. Actors are often confused in real life for the parts they play, performers are thought of as their personas, writers the subjects they write about, etc. People tend to take things too literally, believe that you work of fiction is somehow real, inspired by your personal experiences or reflects upon your own psychology or hidden desires. While this could be true, it should never be automatically, or too literally assumed, especially when it comes to controversial subject matter. Artists can only reflect back and interpret what they see in the world around them, but often society is in denial of its sickness and points the finger back at the artist.

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Film is perhaps the greatest medium due to it’s incredible potential, accessibility and permanence. The downside for independent film makers has always been the high cost of production and the difficulties of distribution.

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
The work I do would not be possible without technology. Digital Hi-Def cameras, digital editing software, virtual music composition software and more, have significantly reduced the cost of film production, and therefore made it possible for micro-budget artists and film makers such as myself to bring their visions to life.
What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Have the courage to follow your bliss, and listen to yourself first and foremost. As Bill Cosby said, “I don’t know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.”

Where can we find you online?

You can find my film “SPIDER” online via my production company (Independent Spirit Films) facebook page via this link…

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Independent-Spirit-Films/163201203343?ref=search&sid=645993176.2085769292..1

Fans can also find my personal facebook page by searching for “Aria Alexandra” and they are welcome to add me as a friend.

“SPIDER” is listed on IMDB.

Anything else we should know?

Never drink apple juice and then eat something pickled with vinegar… *shudder* Bad, bad, bad. Learned that one the hard way.

Nicole I-Nesca

Posted in film, interviews, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 7, 2010 by intoviews
nicole i-nesca

nicole i-nesca

what is your name?

Nicole I-Nesca

how would you describe what you do?

I consider myself a poet.  I try to play around with words and their meanings. Stream of consciousness type scribbling.  I have also collaborated on a screenplay and television script with my husband.  I have been trying to find the focus and the discipline to write a short story and I am just getting started on that project at this moment. A novel?  Maybe in the future.  I also love to draw using the basic contrast of white and black.

what are you currently working on?

I am currently working on my third book.  I’m hoping to include a few short stories and perhaps a few essay type articles.  My first two books were strictly poetry and I am hoping to show or exhibit a few different styles in this new book, KAMIKAZE WHITE-NOISE.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The great songwriters, including but not limited to; Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley, Neil Diamond and Neil Young.  I’ve also been profoundly influenced by the paintings of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dali. I’d be remiss at this point if I didn’t mention the literary influences of Neruda, Hemingway, Nin, Miller, etc. etc.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

I guess it would be the idea that I write from a place of depression or loneliness.  I have received countless messages from readers concerned that I was going through some type of mental under-tow.  Another would be that I am “illiterate”.  I tend to write without punctuation and as I said before I love to play around with words and their meanings, definitions, sounds, placement, etc. etc.  I assume that in doing this, readers have a hard time trying to find the singular purpose or meaning of a piece.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Writing poetry allows me to break the rules or rewrite them as I see fit to do so.  I am only limited by self.

In stark contrast to the freedom of creation the biggest downfall would be, in my opinion, the fact that there are not too many poetry fans left in this world.  Novels, graphic novels, pop singers and cartoons are the biggest sellers in this wonderful period where we find ourselves today.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

The internet has given me many opportunities to read and be read by like minded artists and individuals.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Well, Bukowski is famous for saying, “Don’t try.” I am quite the opposite, I say, “Keep trying.”

where can we find you online?

http://www.ninisabella.blogspot.com/

www.myspace.com/nicolemisabella

http://stores.lulu.com/nicoleisabella

what are you reading at the moment?

I just finished THE RUM DIARY by Hunter S. Thompson.  I am currently bouncing in between PORTIONS FROM A WINE-STAINED NOTEBOOK by Charles Bukowski and SELECTED WRITINGS OF GERTRUDE STEIN.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Duane Andrews CROCUS… a Spanish-style guitar player.

anything else we should know?

I am an ex-patriot American living in Winnipeg, Manitoba where it is a balmy -41 C.  Maybe I should call my next book, TALES FROM THE FROZEN CITY. My husband and I may not sip absinthe in Parisian cafes, but we can find a killer jazz/blues or indie band on any given night. We may have to kill a yeti or two along the way BUT…life is good.

Paraphilia Magazine

Posted in art, film, interviews, music, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 7, 2010 by intoviews
DM Mitchell

DM Mitchell

Dire McCain

DireMcCain (Photo:© 2010 Richard A. Meade)

what is your name?

Díre McCain and DM Mitchell (aka Dave)

We are currently operating as PARAPHILIA MAGAZINE.

how would you describe what you do?

Dave: We are a publishing venture showcasing what has in the past been called experimental, underground and/or Transgressive art, literature and music. However, we want to ditch those labels and bring this sort of material into the mainstream, to redefine, in essence, what constitutes the mainstream. We are NOT a fetish or sex publication, although some of the material we publish deals with those topics in passing, along with all sorts of other things that constitute everyday life.

what are you currently working on?

Díre: We’re in the process of planning the next season of issues – including the new music quarterly – and assembling PARAPHILIA VI, which we’re aiming to release in late January.

Dave: And a new line of books, which will basically constitute the sort of things we’d love to find in bookshops ourselves but which currently don’t seem to exist anywhere. Weird and marvelous stuff.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Dave: To be honest, and not attempting to be oblique or evasive, everything we’ve ever read, watched, listened to, ingested, eaten, drank, liked, hated, everyone we’ve spoken to, fought with, fucked or done business with in any way – all of that has had an influence. Life is like a tapestry that you’re woven into and it’s misleading to try to pick any particular thread out of it. The tapestry would fall apart.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Díre: As Dave stated above, that we’re a fetish or sex publication, although that idea seems to be fading now that we’ve produced five issues which clearly indicate otherwise. On a personal level, it does seem as though people misread us on occasion, although I have no explanation for it other than close-mindedness and snap judgments based on our “wrappers”, which is human nature, I suppose. The editorial in PARAPHILIA IV addresses the issue.

Dave: I also think that people see us as somehow dwelling on ‘dark’ or gloomy subject matter. People seem to think I’m a pessimistic or doomy person, whereas in reality I’m quite happy and generally fun to be around. When I’m with people I spend most of my time laughing. Paraphilia actually has a very vibrant and entertaining ‘picaresque’ basis to it. I see it somehow like a carnival sideshow or fairground, albeit a fairly bizarre one.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Dave: Well the internet is the medium we work in and I think its strengths far outweigh any weaknesses it might have. If pushed I would have to say that If there is any drawback it might be that it is too easy nowadays to get work out there, but then again people are generally capable of discriminating between something of value and something empty or pointless. I trust that they will find a lot of worth in the work we’re helping to disseminate.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Dave: What we are doing wouldn’t be possible without the internet. It’s not just a case of it being a tool that we use to disseminate our material. Our material is inextricable entwined with the medium. It’s grown in it like a type of soil.

Díre: The internet has enabled us to bring people together from all over the globe. Not merely artists of various mediums, but kindred spirits. Without it, PARAPHILIA never would have come to life and burgeoned into the beautiful beast it’s become.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Díre: Always eat your dessert, to hell with the vegetables. J
Dave: Always carry a condom. J

where can we find you online?

The website:

www.paraphiliamagazine.com

We can also be found at:

http://www.myspace.com/paraphiliamagazine

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=49835950764

what are you reading at the moment?

Díre: Since launching the project in early 2009, I haven’t had much time for recreational reading. These days it’s more or less limited to the submissions that come in. I hope to change that sooner than later by developing better time management skills, which is probably a pipe dream.

Dave: In December and January I read a lot of old ghost stories; MR James, Sheridan Le Fanu, EF Benson. Not much else, to be honest, except for the material that is submitted to us. Oh – I had Brian Eno’s biography ‘On Some Faraway Beach’ for Xmas. That’s a nice book.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Dave: The rain.
Díre: My stomach growling to the tune of Earl Hooker’s “You Got to Lose”.

anything else we should know?

Dave: The winning numbers to next week’s Lottery. If you find out, please pass them on.

Andre Navarro

Posted in comics, film, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2010 by intoviews
Andre Navarro

Andre Navarro

what is your name?

André Silva Navarro.

how would you describe what you do?

I try to be versatile. “Writer” doesn’t really cover it, because I also draw and animate in Flash. “Storyteller” brings to mind the image of a creepy old man at a campfire narrating scary tales to a bunch of kids before picking one to rape. Please note that when I said “brings to mind” I meant MY mind, which, as you’ll notice throughout this interview, doesn’t tend to think of nice things very often. I think “narrative artist” works, though — I write fiction, I draw a webcomic and the covers to my own fiction when I publish them on http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/“, I make flash animations and, as a hobby, I also review works in three narrative mediums: comics, movies and games. I might start adding novels to that when I find enough time to read them regularly, since I’ve been so busy I feel like this whole “24-hour-day” thing is a bullshit myth.

what are you currently working on?

Active projects: I’m writing a sci-fi novel called “Ares”, currently 23.000 words into the second draft. It’s about the construction of a large spaceship, ARES, in Earth’s orbit and the seven astronauts who find themselves in a desperate situation during its second mission. It’s currently my main project, requiring loads of research and thorough revision. Tough, but satisfying — well, not that satisfying yet, but hopefully it will be. If I keep a regular work schedule it should be published in Print-On-Demand and E-Book formats after February. All I know is that it won’t be finished BEFORE February. It’s been in the works for a year and a half — hell, perhaps two. The other project, aside from mantaining http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/ , is writing fiction regularly, mainly for http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/, which has recently received an extreme makeover and is looking gorgeous. Projects for the future: a noir graphic novel with the provisional title of “Morris” (to be changed due to its similarity to “Ares”, which is a final title) about an LAPD detective in the near future who had his life drained by a two-year long case which, as the icing on top of a shit cake, results in a terrible personal catastrophe that pushes him over the edge. Artwork will be stark black and white provided by me. A flash animation to the sound of Goldfrapp’s superb song, “Utopia” — which will require the most meticulous and difficult animation process I’ve ever tried. And there’s a shitload of other things waiting as well, but that’s enough for now, as they’re so many that if I try listing them I’ll start crying again.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I think the person who kick-started me on the general direction of art was Charles Chaplin. When I was fourteen or fifteen, my father showed me one of his movies on a TV channel, and I found it hilarious (his second film, Kids Auto Race At Venice). I sought the rest of his work and fell in love with it. Furthermore, the consistently amazing work of my favorite writer, Garth Ennis, as well as movies like “Carlito’s Way”, cemented my love for narrative arts and my wish to create them. There’s a bunch of other influences — Warren Ellis, Alan Moore, Chan-Wook Park, Bill Hicks and so forth. I try to extract a lesson from anything, even — perhaps especially — when it’s a “how NOT to do it” kind of lesson, like when I’m watching a Paul W. S. Anderson film.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

About my work, I’m not aware of any. About me, some people complain I’m negative and pessimistic — which I am, but I exaggerate it online to have a sense of humor about myself. In real life I’m amiable and smile (way too) often.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

For publishing fiction on the Internet — easy to get readers, hard to keep them. The constant flux of information on the web keeps your attention diverted, making it hard to concentrate — I mean, I have about thirteen tabs open right now — but it’s much easier to expose your work to a relatively large audience (as in, someone other than your mom). For writing a novel — it’s gratifying to build something so complete, so full of information, detail and with more than enough space to develop characters — it’s also very tiring and occasionally frustrating to think of enough subplots for the book and come up with good enough reasons for their existence so they won’t be mere filler. It has to be thoroughly planned, and it’s so easy to miss something during revision and end up with a huge plothole or inconsistency. For drawing a webcomic — excellent outlet for my dark sense of humor and the format I chose allows for fairly quick production — but coming up with something worth making a joke about is always a challenge, which is why I always keep five or six strips ready in advance. I’m very afraid of authoring one of those comedy webcomics that forget the punchline, replacing it for pseudo-witty dialogue or falling into repetition. For animating in Flash — creating something like a flash animation from scratch is immensely gratifying — it also requires immense amounts of patience, and I always had ideas for flash animations I couldn’t follow through with because I don’t have access to a team of voiceover actors. I’m thinking of ways around that.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Hugely – meeting people for collaborative projects, self-publishing, quick research, animating, drawing, all more possible as technology advances. I’ve had it easy — being nineteen years old, I started doing this when the Internet already existed.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Don’t lie to an artist. Don’t tell him his work is good if you don’t think so to make him feel better, because ultimately you’re fucking him over. Be honest but constructive. And if you’re an artist, ask the same, but be mindful of who’s giving you the advice — if the person uses “LOL” a lot and commits too many grammar mistakes in a single sentence, don’t feel bad if he doesn’t consider your latest project a masterpiece (but if he does you’ll feel good anyway, won’t you?). And if you get a lot of praise, cheer up but don’t believe the hype. Always doubt your own work. Be your own worst enemy regarding criticism. It hurts, but it helps you evolve.

where can we find you online?

My website contains all my work, either in it or linking to it. Check the Categories column, where I’ve organised pretty much everything on the site as neatly as I could:

http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/

And for everything else (Twitter, e-mail, flash animations, Flickr) check this section of the website: http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/about/

Also, http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/oneauthor.php?id=26 profile on Weaponizer

what are you reading at the moment?

“The Physician”, by Noah Gordon. Well-researched and good characters, although the prose is a bit basic and uninspired. Also badly-translated — the mistakes start on the damn title, “O Físico”, which in Portuguese means “The Physicist”. I’m always reading comics — I don’t like superheroes, so I’m inclined to writers like Garth Ennis and Warren Ellis. Also a lot of research for “Ares”.

what are you listening to at the moment?

When I started answering this interview, “Sad Connections” — a gorgeous piece from the “Sympathy For Lady Vengeance” soundtrack. Also listening to the soundtrack of “Oldboy” (one of my favorite soundtracks of one of my favorite films). I’ve recently become a fan of Goldfrapp and I’ve been enjoying Electric Six. The terrible “The Princess And The Frog” gave me an urge to listen to the soundtrack of some Disney films which are actually good, by masters like Alan Menken and Hans Zimmer.

anything else we should know?

When that picture was taken, I had just shaved most of my beard, took the pic, and shaved the rest. I don’t actually have a moustache, although some people insist shaving it off was a bad idea, and others are still on their knees in gratitude to Heaven that I didn’t keep it.