Archive for the photography Category

Ben Umstead

Posted in interviews, news, photography, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on May 5, 2011 by intoviews

what is your name?
Benjamin David Umstead. Or well, just Ben. I had a book entitled that when I was a kid.

how would you describe what you do?
With all it’s ups and downs, both internal and external… I’m a storyteller – with pen, paper, the camera, the computer.

what are you currently working on?
I’m in the thick of the Tribeca Film Festival writing movie reviews, so all prose is on hold at the moment.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Hmmm a “what” rather than a “who”… well… when I’ve drawn from my own experiences, that has usually resulted in some of my best work, even if said work is a supernatural, fantastical piece. It’s all about that emotional truth or intrinsic truth. What you relay between the lines, between each sentence, word or letter, that feels far more important… what resonates, what is transmutable.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
I don’t think my work has been read or seen wide enough to have garnered any misconceptions yet. Though I’d be glad to say otherwise.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
Fiction can be fast and prompt, you don’t need anyone else to help execute a vision. When the great muse whispers in your ear you can just dive right in. Relaying an image that might be more appropriate for a film, more ambiguous let’s say; it can sometimes be hard to find the right words for that.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
I do most of my writing on the computer so it’s a means to an end; my infernal machine, my friend, my foe.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Follow your bliss. When in doubt, breathe consciously, and seek the company of others.

where can we find you online?
My film writing can be found at Twitchfilm.com
My film work can be found at vimeo.com/benumstead
My photography can be found at flickr.com/photos/benumstead

Unfortunately my prose does not have a current online home.

what are you reading at the moment?
“Autobiography of A Yogi” by Paramahansa Yogananda for my spiritual apprenticeship at a consciousness school. “The Wasp Factory” by Iain Banks, and “Livability” by Jon Raymond, who is also the co-writer of my favorite film of the year thus far “Meek’s Cutoff”.

what are you listening to at the moment?
The ambient guitar workings of Noveller… just got my Stravinsky and Shostakovitch discs back, as they had been in a closet in Brooklyn for ten months, so I’m happy about that (although how one could be happy about listening to a Shostakovitch symphony is kind of ironic), and Smoke Fairies are on a constant loop.

anything else we should know?
If anyone would like to give me some kind of paid full time or part time job writing I’d be happy to oblige them.

Advertisements

Carol Maric

Posted in art, interviews, music, news, photography, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2010 by intoviews

Carol Maric

Carol Maric

what is your name?

Carol Maric

how would you describe what you do?

“My life goal? Literary Immortality—without compromise.”

“I would rather be skydiving while writing a book”

“I am paradoxically precocious, belated, and posthumous.”

philosopher, polymath, writer, poet, musician, artist.

Author of the unpublished masterpiece PROTEAN NotUnTitled: The Philosophical Cantos (copyright 2000 Library of Congress), Carol Maric has presented the manuscript thus far to only a few, including Harold Bloom and Jacques Derrida, who had favorable comments. The work is akin to late James Joyce with Nietzschean poetics, highly baroque, and deeply complex in its content and language—an original extension of the English language, elucidating the ambiguities of various extremities of mind. This is the sort of book in which an author’s work might culminate, yet it is a first work.

Maric has since been writing a lengthy novel for several years, as well as another book of poetry, and essays; future works include books of philosophy, microfiction, and the (under construction) online literary journal Alidade Review.

She is also a multifaceted musician (electric cello, violin, and voice), and visual artist (photography, painting, and drawing).

what are you currently working on?

Philosophy.

I consider Philosophy to be the highest pursuit of the mind.

My independent study has been non-linear (within and across texts), primarily associative, and focused on a few great philosophers, along with other great literary writers and poets (why settle for anything less?), with whom I develop immediate affinities—I can feel their presence alive on the other side of every page I view and touch; I experience “discourse” with their minds as my thoughts immediately react to, and counteract theirs—imaginary debates and associative connections always ensue, during varying speeds of interaction ranging from slow, close, and deconstructive to mercurial, firestorming readings.

I am always studying everything and everybody around me, as my mind is never at rest, even while I sleep, although I experiment with transcendental meditation and biofeedback to explore stillness.

Having just completed the extensive project of familiarizing myself with the history of western philosophy, from its origins to the present, in order to broaden my base knowledge, in a linear manner, I am now about to go back through it all again in an even more comprehensive mode, in tandem with studying my favorite philosophers further, while writing philosophy.

I am founder and group leader of MySpace’s Philosophy / Critical Theory Group, one of the largest and flourishing public forums in the Science & History category, since 2004.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The greatest influence on my work was the death of my father, which caused me to emancipate myself at the age of 33.

I credit my father with teaching me how to write exceptionally.

Due to concurrent, life-altering events, I began a reassessment of my life and circumstances, and decided to radically change them. My introduction to the philosophical writings of Friedrich Nietzsche could not have been better timed or needed: his work became a life saving necessity and dark comfort in a raging tempest; it was then that I realized how important philosophy was to become to me, even though I had always been essentially a philosophical being, gestating and developing ideas over a long period of “undeclared” time.

I became actively autodidactic, as a voracious reader—and continue to be an enthusiastic advocate for the dissemination of knowledge through books.

Once I was acclimatized in my new environment, I started to seriously use the gifts that I had always possessed; after experiencing years of financial hardship and circumstances that severely constrained my freedoms during an singularly unconventional upbringing, my options continued to be narrow in my adult years until the breakthrough—I have not looked back since!

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

No one yet knows the magnitude and importance of my poetry.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I work in several mediums, just as I invent different styles within them, and find no strengths or weaknesses, but one’s own—relentless experimentation is absolutely essential!

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Dissemination as Revolution.

My stance on Writing & Publishing: No Editing Allowed, except one’s own volitionally (otherwise known as crafting), is an uncompromising stipulation of mine; It is either In or Out—Curators, Not Editors.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Develop an insatiable desire for knowledge, and feed it constantly!

where can we find you online?

PERSONAL:

www.myspace.com/carolmaric

www.facebook.com/carolmaric

www.groups.myspace.com/philosophycriticaltheory

www.twitter.com/carolmaric

www.linkedin.com/in/carolmaric

WRITING:

www.huffingtonpost.com/carol-maric

www.myartspace.com/zoominpage.do?imgpath=http://www.myartspace.com/repository/images/o/o1f9ofty29yxab32.jpg

www.cherrybleeds.com/words/guest1/carol-nov07.html

www.writerscafe.org/writers/Carol%20Maric/

www.ornerywoman.com

www.maricthinkpad.wordpress.com/

www.alidadereview.com

MUSIC:

www.myspace.com/damagedfranklin

www.myspace.com/212noiseorg

www.last.fm/user/mathgeekepii10

www.last.fm/group/Experimental+Vocalists

ART:

www.myartspace.com/carolmaric


what are you reading at the moment?

Too many books to mention: I usually read many, many hardcopy and digital books concurrently, kaleidoscopically shifting onward.

Some of my favorite philosophers and writers are Friedrich Nietzsche, Immanuel Kant, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Georges Bataille, Jacques Derrida, Willard Van Orman Quine, Karl Popper, Michel Foucault, Emil Cioran, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, Charles Baudelaire, T.S. Eliot, Dante Alighieri, Anne Rice, Antonin Artaud, Fyodor Dostoevsky, George Gordon Byron, Louis Zukofsky, Henry Miller, Vladimir Nabokov, Virginia Woolf, Henry James, Maurice Blanchot, Peter Handke, David Foster Wallace, Mark Z. Danielewski, John Berryman, Bryan Magee, and Blah3x^n—thus spake mathgeekepii10.

what are you listening to at the moment?

I am listening to the various sounds of my environment.

Philosophy lectures on my iPhone at iTunes University, a simply amazing educational project; and JM Roberts’ History of the World on my Zune, along with nonstop, multicrossgenremusic: classical, jazz, rock, experimental avant garde, noise, field recordings—anything and everything!

I have been particularly fascinated by Beck’s work, for several years now.


anything else we should know?

My Intellectual Inheritance:

Great Uncle: Leon Samson, who attended CCNY and Columbia, was an American Marxist social theorist of the 1930s, wrote the books The New Humanism, The American Mind: a Study In Socio-Analysis, and Toward a United Front: A Philosophy for American Workers. Samson is discussed in several books, papers and lectures by the political scientist Seymour Martin Lipset, and cited by numerous others in books and papers found primarily on Google Books.

Mother: Judith Greene is a criminal justice policy analyst who has been working in the field for nearly 40 years, and whose work is reflected in her many influential articles cited by major publications; her work is known both domestically and internationally.

Father: Joseph A. Greene attended NYU, became a teaching fellow at Michigan University at a young age, won a Hopwood award for poetry, acquired the English department’s first Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship, and was mentored by literary critic and author Austin Warren. Though he did not complete his dissertation, he continued as an assistant professor at a few colleges in MI, NJ and NY. He was a visual artist.

Coda: Maybe I will discuss my other work at another time here . . . Nice to meet you all.

Luna Portnoi

Posted in art, interviews, news, photography, update with tags , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2010 by intoviews

what is your name?

LuNa / (moon)

how would you describe what you do?

I express myself out, trying to do it without limits.

what are you currently working on?

I´m painting walls and some different stuff (objects, canvas, illustration, etc.)

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The universe, feeling it. Nature in all its beauty.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

People tend to think I’m really LuNa, and she´s only a (important) part of myself.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I do my work by heart so I don´t expect something specific about it. The best thing is sharing it with lots of people and having all kind of feedback.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I don´t use much technology on my work, it´s almost everything made by hand.

But, I can share my work with people all around the world thanks to technology and that´s awesome!!!

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

follow your heart and always be true to yourself! Just smile and you will probably change the world (at least yours)

where can we find you online?

www.flickr.com/lunaportnoi

Lunaportnoimarcovsky on facebook.

what are you reading at the moment?

cortázar

what are you listening to at the moment?

right now, Beirut! But I listen lots of music… lisandro aristimuño, Carla Morrison, devendra benhart, the beatles were with me today!

anything else we should know?

everyone in this planet might try some chocotorta, the best cake ever!

Irene Caesar

Posted in art, interviews, news, photography, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 27, 2010 by intoviews
irene caesar - self portrait with a fur collar fragment

irene caesar - self portrait with a fur collar fragment

Click Here For Close-Up Fragments Of Some Of These Pictures

what is your name?
My name is Irene Caesar.

how would you describe what you do?
I am a provocateur and saboteur, a gadfly that stings the eyes and tongue of the fat eagle, owl and goat.
I specialize in ideological diversions and subversions in the form of absurd performances which I document by photography, and by other visual and verbal means.
These absurd performances put to the test the major concepts of human civilization, both esoteric and exoteric, mystic and market-place, from the masses and the elite, covert and mass-advertised.

what are you currently working on?
I am writing a book which will represent my recent project “A New History of Ideas in Pictures” in the context of the ideological struggle between the major ideological world-powers.

I am preoccupied with two issues: first, the shadow power and secret government, and, second, its transhumanism / eugenics ideology leading now to the creation of the post-human society of cyborgs.

I am specifically interested in how the Light got corrupted by the Manechean principle and the hierarchical principle of secret societies, and by the principle of secrecy itself, and how the bearers of light got transformed by these three principles into the bearers of darkness who profess elitism as the most subtle and most extreme form of racism / fascism.

I am also concerned with the issue of whether individuation is in principle possible if any structural formations between the individual and the state will be destroyed by the globalist project of a one-government New World Order:
national government with its patriotism, local religious or spiritual community with its traditions of support, family with its unconditional love, private property that is individually, not corporately / collectively owned.

The problem of individuation and the problem of the opposition between the elite and the masses become vitally important at the present moment. We are going through a technological revolution of cyber, nano and biotechnology, including genetic manipulation, which might lead to the most inhuman form of totalitarianism – technocratic fascism – characterized by total control, loss of privacy, and impossibility of individuation via microchipping / nanochipping / brainchipping as an immediate and direct two-way information-sharing between the individual brain and the collective hive-mind of a control-station fashioned as a superior cyber mind / artificial intelligence or bio-quantum computer. In this biological intelligence enhanced and controlled by the “superior” artificial intelligence, there will be little to nothing left of humanity.
By dehumanizing, it is believed that cyborgs will get rid of pain, and will attain the eternal life-span.

My collection “A New History of Ideas in Pictures” is a document of humanity and my protest against dehumanization.

It documents the humanity with all its human suffering and imperfection before humanity is changed by computational biology, genetic engineering, and merges with artificial intelligence. I believe that it is impossible to document humanity by the photo-journalistic reportage, or street photography, because humans are all about their ideas than simply their bodily manifestations. They are all about the conceptualization of sense-data than simply the animal reflexive life.

The collection is the ideological subversion and diversion of the outdated values that bring suffering to millions of people and distract attention from the technological revolution of computational biology and artificial intelligence that puts the very existence of humankind (freedom and individuation) at stake.

Via the means of art, the collection argues that pain is a necessary part of human existence, for pain is essentially the hyper-sensitivity to the environment, and, hence, the ability to navigate within the environment to a better success. Pain is the very core of individuation – of opposing oneself to the collective mind and other individuals. Even the desire of uniting
with other human beings implies its impossibility, and hence, pain. If cyborgs will lack pain, they will necessarily lack individuation: they will be completely dissolved in the collective hive-mind. On the other side, the collective mind which lacks its individuation as a whole, and the individuation of its every part, will lack the sense of its purpose – its place within the bigger whole of the cosmos. Without the principle of individuation, it will become completely disoriented in the environment, and self-destructive. Without pain, it will succumb to cyber mutations. Thus, there are only two alternatives if the transhumanist project gets realized: either the human civilization will be destroyed first, followed by the destruction of cyber civilization and any civilization on the planet earth; or the Matrix will be necessarily ruled by a group of
rulers who will preserve their humanity, that is, their ability to feel pain, and, hence, their individuation. Both of these alternatives are abhorrent.

The third alternative lies outside the transhumanist project, the lord-serf ideology, the opposition of the elite and the masses, and the very principle of secrecy. It consists in the radical change of the economical and political system beyond the capitalist and socialist opposition. This alternative can emerge only in the multi-national cataclysm – and not because of
the inertia of the masses, but precisely because of the resistance of the elite unwilling to change its laws of wealth distribution, and concede its oligarchic rule to democracy. This cataclysm will be a failure of the new production of the “Hitler” screen-play, being defeated by the forces outside the Occidental secret societies and shadow government in such a way that secret societies and shadow government will be no more.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
I did not allow any great influences on my work. My creative life is a way of individuation – the history of cutting myself out of the collective mind, tradition, family, the accepted national, religious, political, ideological attribution. That is why I both accept and reject everything that influenced me creatively, intellectually, intimately. This cutting myself out was not simply rational and calculative – I have organically grown inside my every cultural continuum, from family to motherland, and have overgrown it. The overgrowing was ecstasy inseparable from suffering. Now I get so galvanized when I see the images of Peterhof, my home town – the world’s cultural treasure – that I cry. Though I know I wondered far beyond return. In my other influence – Russian classical culture – I both treasure the disinterested service to the common good and Tolstoy’s “hive-mind” concept, and reject them when they trample upon individuation. In Aristotle, I treasure the concept that the divine energeia is inside everything and everybody, and that happiness consists in the contemplation of this divine energy, but I reject the hierarchy and inequality, as the apparent inability of Aristotle to grasp that the Light is omnipresent
in its entirety in every point of the cosmos. I admire the idea of the apostolic and Gnostic Christianity that men are gods, because they should identify themselves with their divine nous (mind), but I reject their Manichean division into light and dark, and their belief that the particle forms of life (biological bodies) are evil. In my youth, I was influenced by Hindu Sacred scriptures, and various esoteric schools, especially Blavatsky and Rerich, though I categorically reject the
very idea of the mystical secrecy and initiation, and believe that everybody has free access to the infinite Light, all the time.

In my intimate life, I was in the strongest way influenced by my maternal grand-parents. They lived together for longer than 50 years, and when my grandma died my grandfather hung himself in a shed, because he could not live without her. They communicated without words, but were able to unite their minds without the loss of individuation. In art, my greatest influences were Leonardo da Vinci with his creating of double-entendres, Federico Fellini with his little man and
laughter inseparable from tears, Hieronimus Bosch, Peter Bruegel the Elder, and Otto Dix, with their cosmic encyclopedias of human society and mind. Samuel Beckett did not directly influence me.
And I am glad that he came as simply the confirmation after I have already created my absurdist style.
I came to my absurdist style instinctively and naturally – completely on my own.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
The greatest misconception about me is that I belong to a certain profession or trade.
The greatest misconception about my current work is that it is photography or, more generally, that it is only art.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
My most recent art project was done in digital photography.
I explain the choice of my medium by my belief that very soon humanity, as we know it now, will cease to exist, being changed by computational biology. We have little time left to document humanity in its pure form – with all its suffering and imperfection, and define via the means of art the humanity itself, so that it will not get destroyed by cyborgs.
Photography has an advantage over painting, because its true medium is not objects like brush and paint, or film and lens. Its medium is the immediate interaction between people – between the photographer and the photographed. Its medium, if handled correctly or in-itself, is inter-subjective. The photograph is the visualization of the electrical current between two people.
Only now, when it became digital, photography has fully acquired this gift.

It does not depend any more on the immobility of the sitter — making him “a model”, “an object”, as it was in the old painterly portraiture, or view cameras without the automatic focus.
To be contagious, this electrical current between the photographer and the photographed should be intense and dynamic: it is a kind of trance, when BOTH cry, laugh, or shiver in any other strong emotion.

The true “photographer” is responsible for creating a situation — an electrical circuit for this electrical current to occur. Snapshots do not do. Photojournalism is analogous to the rapture of a raptor on the carrion. Street photography is not condensed enough. It is like the stolen and ambiguous enjoyment of casual sex. It never acquires the spasm of a creative orgasm that lingers for years.

The weakness of the medium is the backside of its strength. Its strength is the transparency of the medium so that the art work appears as if magic out of the inter-subjective interaction between the “photographer” and the “photographed”. Digital photographer of the kind I described is a god who creates worlds out of nothing by the sheer strength of his vision. But the weakness is precisely that the digital medium allows only for a certain amount of individuation in the medium
itself. Digital medium becomes self-destructive when it “appears” or is visible in the digital art work. Over-digitized artwork has a machine-quality to it, which is much more visible than in, let’s say, the work of abstract expressionism which can also be produced by a machine or an animal.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
I have already partially answered this question. So I will just elaborate on what exactly I do with the digital technology of imaging. I work with technology starting with studio strobes, the digital camera and ending with digital post-production. I begin every shoot with a creation of a completely controlled environment, so that my creativity is completely independent from the variants which I do not want to include into my creative process, and I am completely free in my inter-subjective interaction with the actor.
My work is ultra minimal.
I think in advance about the lighting concept, and about a prop that will help me to construct the electrical circuit of my interaction with the actor.
I use only minimal lighting. This does not mean that my lighting is not intricate, but it means that the lighting should be so natural to the concept that it does not become an end-in-itself.
I do not use stage sets because they cannot allow the level of psycho-dynamism that I want.
Instead, I use props as symbolic objects. The symbolic object designates in an indirect way some idea that is very important to both me and a model. In the series, “The World is Made of Plastic,” for example, my models are engaged with plastic in totally absurd ways, metaphorically correspondent to their personal paradigms: some wear plastic as sacred garments or high couture, some eat plastic, some fight with plastic, some dance with plastic, some represent plastic as a cubist
painting, some meditate in plastic cocoons, etc. My function as a director is to bring the actor into a kind of trance when he or she is completely overwhelmed by his or her action with the symbolic object and her or his attention is completely taken away from the camera. This is the other manifestation of my minimalism. The actor concentrates all of his attention on his freedom to act upon the symbolic object, and he or she forgets that he or she can be made an “object”, a “model”
by the presence of the camera. My purpose is to represent people in my images as subjects, not objects – to return them the freedom of individual expression in provocations that urge them to unseal their most hidden fears and desires. In a sense, I do not create stills per se, I create life experiences, as if my art grants my actors extra hours, years of life.
In the same way, when my images are viewed as prints, the attention of the viewer gets so consumed by the action with the symbolic object that the physical appearance of the print gets dissolved.

And my goal is to create images of performances that make people live in front of the camera in a more intense way than how they live in their everyday lives.  In this sense, my staged photography is a counter-staged photography, as well as it is a counter-documentary reportage.  And that is why my images are not simply movie stills, which are the artificial and mannerist cuts from externalized action.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Stay human, do not believe that the artificial intellect is superior to the human intellect only because it has more computing power.
The mind is identical with its object. Think of the infinitely good self-conscious Light, because the DNA are antennae of the electro-magnetic / quantum fields of mind, and minds of those people who think of the The Light become identical with it. Machines will never get to this point, simply because they will never have the infinite connections to the Light coded in human DNA.
But cyborgs can eliminate humans.
DNA is the two-way network of info-matter: (1) it is immediately responsive to vibrations, including emotions, and (2) DNA leaves its holographic imprint upon the quantum field even after it is not present there any more (so-called DNA phantom effect).
Emanate goodness to everybody unconditionally, to strangers, on the street – as a conscious effort of your mind.
Do not believe those who say that life is a struggle of light and darkness. There is the Light that does not cast a shadow. The infinity is bigger than the opposites of light and darkness.
And this infinity cannot be nothing else than the Absolute Light, because it grants life – infinitely.

where can we find you online?
The official website with my current work in art and philosophy and archive is:
http://www.irenecaesar.com

The recording of my Gallery Talk at the VASA Online Gallery, where I discuss the political, social and cultural implications of the technological revolution of the computational biology that is leading now to the emergence of the post-human society, and my response as an artist and philosopher: http://vasa-project.com/archive/video/caesar.html

My youtube channel is: http://www.youtube.com/user/caesarstudios

Facebook fan page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Irene-Caesar-Conceptual-Image-Maker/320247530617

Artslant: http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95214-irene-caesar

what are you reading at the moment?
I am reading Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass”. This book, a very enthusiastic hymn to the individual freedom and historical progress, produces a very sad impression on me.
Whitman creates a concept of the American nation – a super nation – that comes to the historical scene by literally forcing the older nations, American-Indian nations, out from the American soil. I see the other paradigm in the Russian Empire which preserved its smaller nations and their governing.
I intend to create a series of artwork addressing this specific issue.

what are you listening to at the moment?
After intense listening to atonal music, I am now listening mostly to music that combines abstract and representational expression, like Philip Glass and John Adams. By representational expression, I mean the expression of recognizable emotions, with the development of emotion and climax, which are all rejected by serialism. And, in opposition to serialism, I mean by abstract expression the compositional structure of the whole rather than the open grid of abstract units.

anything else we should know?
I create poetry and philosophy. My collection of poetry was published in 2004 by the St. Petersburg University Press. It is also available on my site.

I will have a big show at the Moscow House of Photography in 2011, which is one of the biggest Photography Museums in Europe. For this occasion, I prepare the publication of my art photography book, and my doctoral dissertation devoted to the famous polemics on Aristotle’s notion of happiness. I am also invited to give a talk at the International Philosophy Conference in St. Petersburg in June 2010, where I intend to speak about the issues with transhumanism.

yell saccani

Posted in art, interviews, news, photography, update with tags , , , , , , , , on January 6, 2010 by intoviews

noble savage

noble savage

what is your name?

my real name is yahella saccani vezzani – yell saccani is my short

how would you describe what you do?

how to describe…..i express my feeling, my anger, and strokes through the pictures. i do them only when i feel full.
when i started i didn’t know where it will take me so i’m still teaching my self a lot.

what are you currently working on?

now i’m working on a few projects some of them are not close yet. i prefer not to talk about it. for now i keep on doing more pictures, more movement; i want to do them to look like paintings.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

the greatest influence?i think love
music inspires me a lot too

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

for me the strengths come from the responses i get to my work. people that tell me i inspire them or my pictures say exactly what they feel, like songs that gives me power to do more pictures to work myself till i can’t see. just to try give more to other people.
weakness …art is hard. i’m in a country that art is not on the table – never. it’s very hard for me to move without the internet

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

back to the internet. when i started 3 years ago i didn’t know what exactly i wanna do and where to go. flickr helped me a lot. i get to know great people – some of them helped me a lot to move with my career. the internet gave me the chance to meet a lot of people and get to more and more magazines forums and blogs.
i think internet is the most important tool when you are an unfamiliar artist. with the right sites you can get anywhere you want

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
i will like to tell people to keep on doing what they like without stealing from anyone. do everything by yourself and work till you can’t no more. push your limits, open your mind and most important of all, don’t take bad criticism to the heart. do what you want from the heart and never stop believing that you can do it. i taught myself all and in any of my work; i never used anything of anyone, even the smallest dot in the pictures is mine. when i work with others is all with permission: i will never steal work of others or try to copy. if i don’t have ideas i will simply won’t do anything.

where can we find you online?
you can find me on my site
www.yellsaccani.com

on my flickr account (but only members over 18 can see all the pictures)
on face book
in fact in a lot of places lol

what are you reading at the moment?
i just finished “the death of bunny munro” by nick cave which was very funny and very short. today i just started a book called “special topics in calamity physics” by marisha pessl but i just started so i can’t tell you much. hope its good (in my head its reminds me of donna tartt’s “secret history” one of my favorite books ever but i don’t know yet)

what are you listening to at the moment?

music is my salvation; i cant work or move without it.
at the moment i’m listening a lot to fever ray’s last album; santogold also ruled this year for me; franz ferdinand; radiohead ‘in rainbows’, i cant take it out from my list since its come out; to david bowie always; and to a lot of 80s new wave stuff that the return of the 80s is taking me back to listen.

anything else we should know?

anything else you wanna know? i’m very open; you can ask my everything

Richard Kadrey

Posted in interviews, news, photography, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 3, 2010 by intoviews

Richard Kadrey

Richard Kadrey

how would you describe what you do?

I lie like a dog and make up the most ridiculous shit imaginable and sell it to you for as much money as I can. This makes me pretty much the same as any other writer. I like that writing is about one step removed from grifting. Writers and carnies have a lot in common. We have to jump up and down to sell you our goods, scream at the crowd, do a little dance can promise you two headed babies, talking dogs and angels getting fucked by Harry Potter’s lollipop-farting unicorn. It’s just part of the job of being a writer. Writing is a silly way to make money, but the only other people who get paid to lie for a living are carnies, cops and hookers and those jobs are way too much work.


what are you currently working on?

I just finished up Sandman Slim 2: Kill The Dead. It’s the first sequel I’ve written and it just about killed me. When I only wrote standalone books I could do pretty much anything I wanted to my characters. Kill them, ruin them or fuck them up any way that amused me as a writer. All of a sudden with this book, I had to care about all the terrible things I’d done to these characters in the previous book. Plus, I had to think of new terrible things to do to them while setting things and up for the third book. It was a whole new way of thinking and I learned a lot from slogging through it. And I hope to hell this remains the hardest book I ever write, but that’s never going to happen.
what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Other books and writers, obviously. William Burroughs was a huge influence when I was starting out. J.G. Ballard was another. Elmore Leonard and Barry Gifford taught me to simplify and streamline my prose.

Music is a big influence, too. Early LA and New York punk was the main music of the young me and I have a lot of references to it in my. I’ve also been listening to electronic music since I was a kid. I was introduced to it at a very young age in New York. I don’t remember how young, but it was younger than 10. Maybe six or seven. Ever since then I’ve been fascinated by machine-generated, distorted and unnatural sounds. When I’m working I’ll often have on mild electronics like mid-70s Tangerine Dream or a more recent band with a similar sound, Redshift. When I want something noisier or moody I listen to Lustmord, Controlled Bleeding or William Basinski.

Visual artists have had a big impact my writing. The Surrealists, especially Dali, Ernst and Tanguay. Also photographers such as Joel Peter Witkin and John Santineros.

There plenty of movie influences in my work, too, but you can find those all over Sandman Slim so I’m not going to go into them here.


what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

I don’t own as many guns as Stark, but I used to drink like him.
what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

10 years into the 21st century, books and publishing are finally catching up with the late 20th century. It wasn’t that long ago that Dickens could walk into any publishing house in New York and feel right at home. Publishing was still a horse cart and buggy whip kind of business for way too long. No matter how many computers they had or how much online advertising they did, publishing was still stuck in a business model straight out of the 19th century. Online publishing, print-on-demand, and strange, wonky little devices such as the iPhone and Kindle have blown up publishing in a big way. Publishing is where the music business was a few years ago. They don’t know what they want to be when they grow up, but for the first time they’re taking the question seriously.


how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I couldn’t do 90% of what I do if I didn’t have friendly, relatively non-crashing machines around me. My handwriting looks likes a mental patient scrawled his Oedipus complex nightmares on a wall in his own shit. Even typewriters were deadly for me because I was such a terrible typist. The manuscript for my first novel weighs about 15 pounds because of all the white out and staples holding together all the mismatched paper I used to cobble the thing together. Word processed manuscripts don’t have the character of those old piles of scrawled paper, but I’ll take the ability to actually get the words down in a readable way over amusingly eccentric manuscripts.

I also do a lot of photography and I couldn’t live without Photoshop. It saved my life and whole photo shoots more than once. God bless you, Adobe.


what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

There’s only one piece of advice that’s worth a damn: Don’t kill anybody and don’t kill yourself. Anything else that comes along can be dealt with.


where can we find you online?

RichardKadrey.com and KaosBeautyKlinik.com


what are you reading at the moment?

The City & The City by China Mieville, The Boys by Garth Ennis and  Voluptuous Panic, a book on Weimar Berlin.
what are you listening to at the moment?

Shortwavemusic by William Basinski and the new Tom Waits live album, Glitter and Doom.
anything else we should know?

You’re going to be dead a lot longer than you going to be alive. So, fuck things up and have fun now while you’re something more than a sticky patch of whining ectoplasm stuck to the bottom of God’s Crocs.

David Farmerie

Posted in film, interviews, news, photography, update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 29, 2009 by intoviews

david farmerie

david farmerie

Migrant Tobacco Worker #1

Migrant Tobacco Worker #1

Believe

Believe

Night Train Through Folkston

Night Train Through Folkston

how would you describe what you do?

My work is about telling the story, regardless of whether I am shooting a documentary, a fine art piece, or a portrait, my desire is to reveal, and to tell, the story.

For much of my 32-year career, I grappled with being a photographer. Even though that was my profession, and my passion, I was also very proficient as a writer, a lecturer, and a filmmaker – and I was equally as passionate about all, while I was engaged in them. However, this always created an internal struggle, and that is when I began my quest to find out what I was. After years of searching, I realized – in a very bright-light kind of moment, that I was none of those things – that they were only my tools. In fact… I Am, a Storyteller.

I also feel – have felt for most of my career, that I also have a responsibility to tell the stories that I feel, deep within, are stories worth being told. My desire is to tell the stories that can help to affect change – a positive change, within the world. My desire also, especially with regard to my documentaries, is to show the dignity of those who comprise our world, and to shed light in order to celebrate what we, so much of the time, see only as our differences.

what are you currently working on?

Currently I am working on several documentaries, all in various stages of completion. The documentary, closest to completion, is titled: Roadside Redemption. It is an exploration of the influx in Christianity that is springing up across the highways of our country. This documentary explores the reasons behind this influx, but also delves much deeper – allowing each viewer to draw their own conclusions and to begin a dialog within themselves. The documentary will be released as a large format, photographic exhibition with accompanying videos, in January 2010.

A second documentary, titled: An American Tradition, is a photographic documentary about the traditions of family tobacco farming. My subjects, all from Robertson County, Tennessee, because it is this region that has produced the world’s Dark-Fired Tobacco for centuries, and many of the farms have been farmed by the same families for well over 100 years.


what has had the greatest influence on your work?

This is a difficult question for me to answer concisely, as so many things have had the greatest influences. I suppose, first and foremost, my exposure to so many cultures and people. This, above all else, has caused within me a deep desire to share this with others – in a hope that people will then be able to see those around them… and around the world, in a different – more positive and accepting light.

Also my years in Photojournalism shaped me greatly, as they showed me, first hand, the skewing and half-truths that shaped a great bias within our media. That experience, probably more than any other, sent me on a quest to find the truth in each story, and tell it – completely and allow the viewer to decide.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Misconceptions? What misconceptions?

Seriously though, I don’t really know the answer to this question. I’m sure that there are numerous misconceptions, but I truly have no idea what they are.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I suppose I see the main strength of photography is that it is still, for the most part, considered realism – and perceived, by most, as being the truth. And now, with the incredible advancements in digital photography, my medium has become immediate – almost instantaneous – which is a great asset on many fronts but, especially when I am working with indigenous people, as they can see – immediately, how I am portraying them and… I can print out an image, on the spot, and leave it with them.

For me, however, I find great frustration, (with my medium), when I am creating a fine art piece – and this is where I find its weakness. Granted, advancements in technology have given me incredible tools but… there is still something that I envy about the painter.

The ability to create an image, many times an image that never truly existed in reality, though a process of transferring thought and emotion into colors of paints and brush strokes applied on a surface. This, to me, may be one of life’s truest orgasms.


how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Technology has had, and continues to have, incredible impacts on the work I do. I am still an old film guy, at heart, but the advent, and continued advancements in digital technologies, has allowed me to do my work even better – and far more immediate. It’s interesting, I was just thinking about this one aspect of change earlier today. In the past, I would shoot an assignment, have the film processed (for some assignments at least), and then send the images off to the client. Delivery memos had to be sent and signed. Insurance and shipping charges were incurred, and there always existed he fear that the images would get lost or damaged en route.

Now, I shoot the assignment, download it to my laptop, do a rough edit (and sometimes not), then upload them to my server and notify the client via an email – with a link for the download – and never does the image leave my possession now.

These advancements have also created many new opportunities for experimentation – both from a cost saving factor, and from a tools factor.

New technologies, aside from photographic, have created vast opportunities to connect to people with my work – opportunities that were never available before these advancements.

One of the most amazing things, about these technologies, is that they are truly still in their infancies. Every day I discover something new, even with what has already been developed – as do thousands of others, and we are all able to share these discoveries – again, with immediacy, if we choose, with millions of others. It is like one giant experimental laboratory. It is a most incredible time to be alive.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Be true to yourself and to your passion, (which should be one and the same). Never compromise, if it compromises your integrity, and “always” live from your truth.

where can we find you online?

Everywhere! http://www.davidfarmerie.com is the best place to find a bit about me. I can also be found on the social networking sites – which can be linked to via the links on my website.

what are you reading at the moment?

Everybody Who Was Anybody: The Biography of Gertrude Stein, by Janet Hobhouse.

Brida, by Paulo Coelho.

The Nature of Photographs, by Stephen Shore.

Criticizing Photographs, by Terry Barrett.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Jethro Tull: The Best of Acoustic, and Rachmaninov Piano Concertos.

anything else we should know?

I could probably spend hours – maybe days.

%d bloggers like this: