Archive for the poetry Category

Michael Peck

Posted in interviews, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on April 4, 2013 by intoviews

IMG_0038
what is your name?

Michael Peck.

how would you describe what you do?

Think about writing, read, think about writing, research, consider writing, read, research, think about writing. Afterwards, ideally, I
write.

what are you currently working on?

A novella about utopianism, some short stories, an essay on an Orson Welles film.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I often wonder about that. A little bit of everything, I suppose. A.B. in particular. Music, especially Tom Waits, Schubert and Bach. And also Flaubert, Melville, David Lynch, Edward Hopper, Goya, hardboiled dialog, mineral water, fountain pens, weird motel rooms, Wyoming at midnight, Portland just before sunrise, quantum physics, the Marx Brothers and a good thunderstorm. Yes, a little
bit of everything.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

You’d have to ask someone who is familiar with me or my work.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

There are no constraints in terms of what can or cannot be written or how a storyline progresses; the range of style and expression is unbounded by anything tangible. I think this is also the central weakness of writing, insofar as this endless stream of possibilities makes perfection impossible. But this is true of any medium.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

It has streamlined information-gathering, editing and procrastination.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

From Raymond Chandler: “Write or nothing.”

where can we find you online?

At believermag.com, the2ndhand.com, bibliostyle.wordpress.com, LA Review of Books.

what are you reading at the moment?

The Red and the Black, some Barthes, the aphorisms of Lichtenberg, a history of pulp fiction cover art.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Charles Mingus.

anything else we should know?

I can’t think of anything at the moment.

Advertisements

Karen Jones

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , on April 3, 2013 by intoviews

ch79jpeg

what is your name?

Karen Jones

how would you describe what you do?
I write stories. For the most part short stories, though I have written two novels. The first has to be in the running for ‘worst book ever written’ – it should be used to teach people how not to write. It’s truly awful. The second never got past first draft. I used to write a lot of flash fiction and micro-fiction but, for no reason I can think of, that doesn’t appeal to me so much now.
what are you currently working on?
I always have several short stories at one stage or another. At the moment I have two at the planning stage, one almost completed, one in rewrite and one in final edit. I’m also working on something longer but I don’t know exactly what it will be yet. It may turn out to be a novel or a novella – or it may get slashed to pieces and end up as a haiku.
what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Reading. Seeing how it’s done by the greats.

Art. I used to spend a lot of time in Kelvingrove Art Galleries, getting story ideas from the paintings, people watching for characters, gathering conversation snippets, enjoying the quiet stillness of the place (except when there’s a school party dashing about pointing and sniggering at the paintings of nudes).
Music. A line in a song can spark a whole story, or just the mood of the music can influence how a piece will go.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
About me – that I’m lazy. I’ve heard it so often that I end up believing it. About my work – that if I can do it, it must be easy.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
You have such freedom with writing – anything goes, there are so many genres, so many forms, and you can do it anywhere. You don’t even have to physically write things down; you can be writing in your head and no one around you knows. Everywhere you go, everyone you meet can trigger stories, or single lines, or a poem.
Weaknesses It’s a solitary activity, so it’s easy to become disillusioned and disheartened. Sometimes, when inspiration is lacking, panic can set in and you convince yourself you’ll never write another word.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
My handwriting is atrocious, so using a netbook has made a huge difference. I can write anywhere and can understand what I’ve written when I look back on it later. My phone has also become a great asset. I use the memo function constantly. No more scribbled notes on pieces of paper that are frustratingly indecipherable when I gather them together to turn them into a story. That’s especially true of night time notes. I used to wake up in the morning and look at what I’d scrawled in the middle of the night and have no idea what was written there. Granted, even with phone, I still sometimes wonder what the hell I was thinking. One memo just said, “Something bad happened.” Excellent – someone alert The Booker Prize – I think I have a winning idea here.

The internet has brought ezines – new publishing outlets are always welcome. And, of course, it has also made self-publishing easier but I tend to see that as a double-edged sword.

On the downside, I do faff about on the internet far too often. A tiny piece of research can turn into hours in a Google maze where every new search seems to throw up bizarre or fascinating information that draws me in until I’ve completely lost the thread that would lead me back to my story. I’m very easily distracted.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
My favourite is one of Elmore Leonard’s If it sounds like writing, rewrite it
And from John Steinbeck If you are using dialogue, say it aloud as you write. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
where can we find you online
I’m not very good at self-promotion and having an online presence. I’m on Facebook, occasionally on Twitter and I started a blog but could never really get into it the way some people do, so it’s been gathering dust for over a year now. You can read some of my published work at these places
httpwww.mslexia.co.ukmagazinenewwritingnwstory3_45.php
httpwaterhousereview.wordpress.comcurrent-issue-2#JONES
httpwww.everydaypoets.comherbal-memory-by-karen-jones

what are you reading at the moment?
Room by Emma Donoghue. I’ve just started it but it has me completely hooked. I love when that happens and it’s becoming increasingly rare.

what are you listening to at the moment?
The very noisy fan my netbook sits on, commentary from a football match coming from the TV in another room and how loud my nails are on this keyboard. Must cut nails.
anything else we should know?
I always like to have at least six pieces of work submitted to competitions, publications at any one time. I need to have a goal to work to, otherwise I really would become lazy.
I love salsa dancing. That has absolutely nothing to do with my writing – I just love it and think everyone should do it for health and happiness.

Jesse Glass

Posted in interviews, news, plays, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on April 2, 2013 by intoviews

jesse-cover-flat

how would you describe what you do?

I write poetry, drama, fiction, essays, translations, libretti, paint, draw, engrave, make prints, artist books, visual poetry, sing sound poetry/ do performance/conceptual art (now primarily on the net, but in public venues in the 80’s). I have a puppet theater in Japan. I’ve been doing most of this work since I was 16 years old in the late 60’s because I knew early on that somebody had to do it. I’ve currently lived for more than 20 years in Japan.

what are you currently working on?

Right at this moment: Steinesque Facebook process poetry, which I’ve defined as a form of Experiential Haptic Modeling.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I’ll change that to who: Jenny Holzer for the Facebook stuff. William Blake for just about everything else, but there are scads of others. Joseph Beuys.
what is the greatest misconception(s) about you or your work?

Legion, and they’re all wrong.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

The main strength of paper, canvas and other physical materials is that they are easier to conserve than electronic files. Without constant applications of energy the electronic work pisses away. into oblivion: It’s a bit like carving text and image on the side of a soap bubble.
how has technology had an impact on the work you do?

I don’t swallow the whole bit about computers being the next step in anyone’s revo/evolution and I think that those who mindlessly dish out for up-dates and new versions of “ziz wiz and biz” are in thrall to corporations and hooked on the “freedom” that corporations offer—(I mean the “hey kidz, buy this new car and FEEL FREE in the USA cod-fish hype.) I don’t believe that science has the answer to everything, and I don’t go whoring after it in the manner of so many involved in the humanities. Look at the state of current Philosophy. It’s an embarrassment. Having said all of that, let me add that New technology is a useful tool right alongside the pencil and paper (which at one time was the New Technology), but I refuse to vacate my mind in order to block out the increasingly fucked-up world with anybody’s bought and sold static or to give up whatever personal freedom I have for on-line communities of “Borgist” fascists. Moreover, no amount of gadgetry will give anyone a short-cut to mastery of their chosen art no matter what the wrapper on the box says.
what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Be reckless. Don’t look back. Fuck any kind of nostalgia unless you can snowboard on it. Piss on organized religion. Feel free to hate as well as to love.
where can we find you online?

Look.
what are you reading at the moment?

Everything.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Berg, Schoenberg.

anything else we should know?

If anyone calls you “creative” don’t just be offended–punch them. That term is so fucking demeaning that even businessmen have glommed on to it. Buy my books.

I’m all over the place on the net. I guess UBU-Web and Penn-Sound and Jacket are the best places to find what i do, but there are others.

Victoria Mosley

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on February 6, 2013 by intoviews

Vic Writing

what is your name?

Victoria Mosley

how would you describe what you do?

I’m a poet and novelist

what are you currently working on?

My 10th novel

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

My life

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

N/A

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I work with words and music sometimes and ideas of all kinds ,,,,,,,,,,,I don’t see things in terms of strengths or weaknesses, I see my writing as a gift and I am happiest when writing .

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Made research easier / made it easier for people to access my poetry

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Never give up and keep a journal write every day. Use the whole of life as inspiration and all the five senses

where can we find you online?

victoriamosley.com ………on google ………on FB ………twitter…………Amazon for my books

what are you reading at the moment?

Sebastian Faulks

what are you listening to at the moment?

Zero 7

anything else we should know?

No

Ami Kaye

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on May 18, 2011 by intoviews

what is your name?

Ami Kaye. Ami (uh-mee) is short for Amita, and not pronounced “Amy.”

how would you describe what you do?

I am a journal editor and writer. I publish and manage Pirene’s Fountain, a biannual online poetry journal which will mark its 5th year in January 2012. We’re a global community of editors with diverse styles and preferences. Pirene’s Fountain presents an eclectic blend of work from emerging authors as well as highly accomplished poets. We nominate for the “Best of the Net,” “Best of the Web” anthologies, and “The Pushcart Prize.” We also offer a PF editors’ award, open to all submitting poets but excluding featured/guest poets. Our emphasis is on the celebration of the written word, learning from and inspiring each other without bias for school or genre.

Apart from working on the journal, I also write poetry, reviews, features and articles, and interview various literary personalities. My poetry collection “What Hands Can Hold” was published last April, and a new book “Singer of the Ragas” is slated for release later this year.

what are you currently working on?

I am working on a new poetry book concept, two novel outlines, four book reviews, revising the above mentioned poetry manuscript, planning our Fall/Winter journal issue, as well as editing two anthologies, one of them a “Best of Pirene’s Fountain” for our 5th anniversary next year, and one is a special project to aid Japan, due for release in December 2011. People interested in participating can click on this link— http://pirenesfountain.com/submissions_japan.html

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

*All the writers who have left a piece of themselves in my heart.

*Travelling widely and learning about people and cultures around the world. Exposure to music, dance, concerts, dramas, films, anime, museums, art galleries and alternate art forms that have informed my thinking.

*My parents who provided a richly multicultural upbringing and outlook.

*My husband and sons who are extremely supportive of my work and continue to inspire me.

*People who have read my work/our journal and sent words of appreciation and support—I am grateful and humbled by that encouragement.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Sometimes submitting authors feel that if we do not accept a poem we find something wanting and are rejecting the author. In our case, we get a large volume of submissions. Rather than actively “reject” a work, we are more likely to look through the submissions and search for poems that leap off the page. Those are the poems we place on our list. Since we do have a cutoff number (It can vary between 40-60 poets, depending on how many pieces we take per poet), the ones who do not end up on the list are sent a note stating truthfully that their poem was “not accepted for this issue.” Sometimes that means we already picked a poem addressing a particular subject and did not want a duplicate, or that it just was not right in some way for this particular issue, but more often than not, it means someone else’s poem connected with us first.

Basically, we want to like poems sent to us because they make the content of our journal, so when we read, we are already in a mindset to accept rather than reject poems.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

The major strengths of our online medium are immediate and easy access to the journal and the ability to navigate back and from various resource links, such as author websites, vendor links to order books, etc. Also, the ability to make post-release corrections is convenient, something difficult or not possible at all in a print medium.

At one time online journals were not taken seriously, and submitting writers had the feeling that in some way they were inferior to their print counterparts. That perception is changing, I think. Now many more poets and writers are publishing their work online and are comfortable with the idea.

There is an entire discussion to be had on the sheer volume of work published online and how it affects the quality of literature and arts. I think that conversation will have to be addressed at another time, but suffice to say, I believe that good work will always stand out, and people desirous of finding such work will be able to do so online or in print. There are some people who do not have web access or some who prefer to “hold” the journal or book while reading, and may find it cumbersome to sit at a computer. However, now with iPad and products like the Kindle, people may find a way around those disadvantages.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

This is a fluid and fascinating time for publishing and writing. The internet has made it possible for journals without any monetary backing to run a professional grade organization, as is the case with Pirene’s Fountain, which is neither affiliated with an academic organization nor the recipient of any grants or donations. For us, going online saves us the overhead costs associated with a regular publishing company. We are able to deliver the magazine immediately upon release, distribute it to numerous readers and gain exposure via various networking sites and other venues. (It saves paper too!)

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Editorial boards serve the writer best if their journals run in a smooth and efficient manner. Writers who follow submission guidelines save organizational time for the journal and are also most likely to send in work that is most compatible with the journal requirements and aesthetics. A bit of courtesy on both sides can make the entire process more comfortable.

where can we find you online?

amikaye.com, pirenesfountain.com, Facebook, Pirene’s Fountain Poetry (a group on Facebook ) Goodreads, Twitter, Linked In and MySpace.

what are you reading at the moment?

If I start to name titles and authors I may not be able to stop, so I’ll just say I read reams of poetry every day…new stuff, old stuff and everything in between. I respect writers who employ a wide range of topics and treatment in their work. I enjoy fiction, history, mythology, well-written fantasy and science fiction. I read reviews, interviews and a lot of journals. I love work from Europe, China, Japan, Korea, and Africa, and dip occasionally into Zen philosophy, Sufi mysticism, and the rich, colorful tapestry of Indian writers. While I am perfectly harmless in a jewelry store, letting me loose in a bookstore can inflict major damage on a credit card.

what are you listening to at the moment?

My taste in music is as eclectic as my taste in literature—I’ve been listening to a mix of opera, jazz, classic rock and ghazals recently, but hands down, listening to my sons play piano together is the high point of any day! Their most recent pieces were Grieg’s concerto in A, and Rachmaninoff’s concerto no.2 arranged for two pianos.

anything else we should know?

The reason I greet every journal issue with enthusiasm is because I get to work with an awesome team—Oliver Lodge, Charles Morrison, Lark Vernon Timmons and Tony Walbran are not only talented editors and writers, they pitch in with features, interviews, submissions and all the other components that make Pirene’s Fountain a solid piece of work we can believe in. Katherine Herschler and Tracy McQueen from our production team tie the journal together seamlessly with a keen sense of aesthetics. The PF Team is dedicated, enthusiastic and serious about providing a unique platform for our poets, writers and readers. Add to that to a dynamic and generous writing community and I count myself as very, very lucky.

michael basinski

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on May 14, 2011 by intoviews

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

what is your name?

Michael Basinski

how would you describe what you do?
poetry

what are you currently working on?
large sized 3ft x 3ft visual poems and in which are vowel creatures and poetic plumbing and a form of text poem called a Trailer. A Trailer is a like a movie trailer with only the hot parts of a poem in a poem.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
the cruelty and stupidity of the human race

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
that it (the poems) are/is confusing, that I am Justin Timbersnake

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
the cruelty and stupidity of the human race

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
great ability to disseminate poems that are drawn

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
don’t quit your day job

where can we find you online?
ubuweb
http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/museless-now-fay-wray/14442999
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwERys-O6hU
http://reconfigurations.blogspot.com/
http://anti-poetry.com/anti/basinskimi/

what are you reading at the moment?
The Idiot, Collected Letters Between Kerouac and Ginsberg, Miserable Miracle, The Craft of Poetry, etc.

what are you listening to at the moment?
Robert Johnson
Bo Diddley

Gillian Prew

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on May 13, 2011 by intoviews

how would you describe what you do?
I write poetry exclusively – free verse. I did start a novel 15 years ago entitled, Socrates Dissatisfied, of which I wrote 40,000 words and ended up pretty much in agreement with Socrates.

what are you currently working on?
I am not working on anything in particular at the moment, just writing poems as they come to me. I have recently finished a series called DISCONNECTIONS which has been published as a chapbook by erbacce-press. As the title suggests each poem deals in some way with my feeling of disconnectedness to the world.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
I think influences are often subliminal and come from all areas of living. Certainly, I have been influenced by the dead poets…Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Dylan Thomas, but also from literature…Dostoevsky, Camus, Kafka, Celine, Cioran, and from philosophy to some extent where I have my education…Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger. Also, a couple of living poets I feel have influenced me…David McLean and Carolyn Srygley-Moore. There are three female poets currently writing in the UK who I feel I must also mention here…Petra Whiteley, Maria Gornell and Jacqui Corcoran. All three have provided some form of inspiration for me.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
I’m not sure. I guess some might think I am a pessimistic poet, but I think that’s merely because I acknowledge quite often the fact that we die, and then there’s nothing. Personally, I find this quite reassuring.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
I think poetry feels inaccessible to some, somewhat erudite and impenetrable. This can be true, but I do believe on the whole that the effort taken to appreciate poetry is part of its strength. Its layers of meaning, its dedication to language, its demand upon the intellect are all necessary to avoid the dumbing-down we so often see around us in most forms of popular media. There seems to be a group of poets insistent on reducing poetry to the simplest terms but I think if this was to become the poetic norm then I would discard poetry as an art form altogether. Poetry is all about making things seem new, showing the world in a different way, attacking one’s thinking from an angle so to speak. Another strength of poetry is its ability to resonate immediately regardless of time taken to analyse it. Often, I have had a instant resonance somewhere inside, that feeling of affinity I think the human being so much requires.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
I doubt I would ever have anything published were it not for the internet. It makes networking and submitting spectacularly easy. There are forums for feedback and opportunities to read and befriend other poets. Computers themselves make writing and editing far easier, although it is always nice to write in a notebook with ink one’s thoughts as they come. I think technology has revolutionized the writing world on the whole, providing accessible publishing, marketing and networking opportunities.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
I am not in a position to give out advice. However, I am attracted to the beginning of Anne Sexton’s ‘Live’…

Live or die, but don’t poison everything…

where can we find you online?
http://gillianprew.wordpress.com/

what are you reading at the moment?
I pretty much read only poetry. I haven’t read a novel in years. I have been trying to read Heidegger’s Poetry, Language, Thought, but inevitably I am seduced by the poems themselves and always have Plath, Sexton and Thomas on the go. Lately I have been reading the work of Michael Mc Aloran, a poet friend of mine, whose poetry is beautifully brutal and whose prose is sublime.

what are you listening to at the moment?
Strangely to some I seldom listen to music. The way my life is constructed means that I do not have much time to sit down and listen to it. If I were to put on something it would probably be Nick Cave or some form of Classical.

anything else we should know?
I have another chapbook forthcoming from Virgogray Press entitled, in the broken things. Not sure when it’s coming out though.

%d bloggers like this: