Archive for the writing Category

Meredith Yayanos

Posted in art, film, interviews, music, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on June 3, 2013 by intoviews

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What is your name?
O HAI! I’m Meredith Yayanos. How are YOU?

How would you describe what you do?
Lots of music, words, and imagery. Most of the stuff I make and do ends up being conversational and collaborative in nature. From 2007 – 2012, I was devoted to an online/print venture called Coilhouse Magazine with co-founding creator, publisher and partner Nadya Lev, as well as many other wonderful weirdos. It was, and remains, “A Love Letter to Alternative Culture”. The project’s on hiatus for now, but <CHEERFULPLUG> you can download all six of our print issues as free PDFs at the archival website, and the blog also contains thousands of entries on a wide variety weird and beautiful and funny topics. </CHEERFULPLUG> These days, I’ve gone back to making music pretty much full time; I play violin and theremin and sing. Score films. Oh! And recently I’ve started dabbling in making pretentious artsy fartsy films of my own. That’s been fun.

What are you currently working on?
I’m finishing up the final leg of production of an album of “haunted chamber music” by The Parlour Trick, my duo with fellow multi-instrumentalist Dan Cantrell. Ghostly, modern classical/aggro-ambient instrumentals. Piano, violin, theremin, musical saw, witchy vocals, harpsichord, celeste, pump organ, electronics, etc. Right now the project’s badass designer, Star St. Germain (who also worked on Coilhouse!) and I are sussing out all of the packaging for the Parlour Trick CDs and vinyl, which should hopefully go to press and be available for sale shortly. Meantime, on my lonesome, I’m devoting the bulk of my time to various aspects of reward fulfillment for the hundreds of Kickstarter backers who chipped in to get the album and related materials funded. (Any of you guys reading? You know who you are! HAY. I LURVE YOO. SORRY IT’S TAKING SO LONG.) You can buy the music digitally on Bandcamp. I’m also about to shoot a second Parlour Trick music video in New Zealand with my sweetheart, Madeleine Ledespencer, and a bunch of amazing folks we know from the Weta / Wellywood film industry. I seriously have no idea WTF I’m doing, yet. But I’m excited!

What is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
Oof… I guess it’d be that lot of people think I’m an extrovert. I’m really not. Actually, I’m an extremely shy, anxious person. Always have been. I started performing on stages in front of people when I was five. Then and now, I’m terrified of crowds and exposure. You’re basically talking to an introvert who, at some point, somehow managed to convince herself and everyone else otherwise by developing halfway-adequate social skills. (Related: I’ve had a solo music project in the works called “The Ever Present Tense” for well over fifteen years now. It’s like this hideously sparkly paste-jewel-encrusted lithopedion baby cataloging my various neuroses, including GAD, PTSD, and BDD. Woohooo, partaaaay. Sure to be an instant classic.)962839_10201112870372994_1252226957_n

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
The allure of wordplay, yum yum. There’s that delicious brainmeat frission that happens when you read or craft just the right turn of phrase. But the medium has its weaknesses, too, in that words… well, they fail. A lot. Words fail me every day. All the time. Because they put me at a remove from more atavistic sensations, connections, communications. Which is why I love music so much– the ribcage-expanding, gut-and-capillary level reaction it can trigger. Music is my magick. Also, the visual resonance of art and design: when I lean both my body and my brain into a piece of music… I see landscapes and I feel textures. And then that’s when the most unfailing words come– stories that have steeped in sounds and images.

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
Immensely. In too many ways to count. Coilhouse Magazine couldn’t have existed without the global network we all built together online, and the kinship that sprang up from it. More generally, I’d say that many of the most wonderful collaborators I’ve worked with, across multiple mediums, are thanks to BBSs and chat rooms, and later on, social networking sites like Livejournal, Twitter, Tumblr. Every day, no matter where I am in the world, I can interface with authors, fashion photographers, editors, musicians, and filmmakers… all thousands of miles away. With a good pair of headphones and an Apogee One, I can (and have) recorded full-length film scores on my laptop in the midst of traveling internationally. I’m about to email this interview to you while I’m at ten-thousand feet in an airplane. I have cherished loved ones that I’ve never met face to face, and it’s a non-issue, because we’ve found ways to share our art. This world, and my subsequent work, is largely post-geographical, and I find that miraculous.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
The world can be brutal and unyielding. Please don’t let that take your luminosity away. Stay open. Stay kind. Stay grateful. Cherish yourself and cherish your loved ones. It’s good to be gentle, and it’s okay to yield. Do not be afraid to work veryveryeveryhard for a longlonglongtime on whatever it is that you love without receiving any validation or reassurance from outside sources. Just enjoy the adventure and rise to meet the challenge of the work itself. Don’t waste time worrying about what anyone else is going to think about the work you do, because it’s really none of your business. Most importantly, stop waiting for someone else to give you permission to be who you want to be, or to do what you dream of doing. And finally… regret is okay, and remorse is often warranted. But shame? Shame is bullshit. Shame is a colossal waste of life, so please, PLEASE work to find ways to regularly unpack whatever shame you have accrued. Pull it out of yourself, somehow, and burn it. Dance around that fire until it dies down, and then walk away.

Where can we find you online?
http://theparlourtrick.bandcamp.com/
twitter.com/theremina
theremina.tumblr.com/

What are you reading at the moment?
If music is my magick, then reading is my ritual! “The John Varley Reader” (a great collection of his short stories spanning thirty years), “Gun Machine” by Warren Ellis (relentlessly badass), “The People’s Guide to Los Angeles” by Laura Barraclough, Wendy Cheng, and Laura Pulido (highly recommended for anyone who’s curious about the invisible underpinnings of that city, both structurally and culturally) Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 (gobsmacking!), and, most affectingly, the first 200 pages of a novel-in-progress by a very brilliant friend. Re-reading, actually, multiple times a month, as the working draft evolves. Watching this story grow from the ground up is easily one of the most spellbinding and nourishing experiences I’ve ever had, or ever will.

What are you listening to at the moment?
On heavy rotation this week: Sun Ra’s “Space is the Place”, Shostakovich’s Piano Trio No. 2 In E Minor (Kalichstein Laredo Robinson Trio recording), Sibylle Baier, Gazelle Twin, K. Flay, Cabaret Voltaire, Miles Davis’ “Bitches Brew”, Goblin, Clint Mansell’s score for “Stoker”.

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Anything else we should know?
Yes. Please, please support the artists who make the songs and stories and pictures and dance and theatre that move you. If you appreciate their art, and you can afford to do so, please *buy* that art. But even if you can’t afford to buy their work, then talk about it, share it, celebrate it in some fashion that respects and values the artist as well as the art. Give them credit. Say their names.

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Hannah Dostine

Posted in art, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2013 by intoviews

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What is your name?
As a creative polymath, I go as HRD (pronounced, ‘heard’) but am usually known as the zinemaker, Hannah Rose Dostine and am slowly introducing the name, Hans Vega.

How would you describe what you do?
As an assortment and overlap of self-made projects, zinemaking, drawing, beatnik writings and daydreaming with an edge of sustainable and ethical activism…or something like that 🙂

What are you currently working on?
I’m preparing for the Canberra Zine Emporium 🙂

What has had the greatest influence on your work?
Definitely my ambiguous mental health. But also my imagination, hands down.

What is the greatest misconception about you and your work?
The way I come across I always worry is disinterested, awkward and as a social face a bit wobbly and hardly around (but i hope people know how much i appreciate them) I feel that hinders or could be seen in my work. Otherwise if anything I think what i convey through personal symbols may be ambiguous/misunderstood, but my subject matter is also a life struggle that I find difficult to express.

What do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
I am still developing and experimenting but I have become comfortable with fineliner. I find its saturating effect great to convey my theme. As for weakness, merely educating myself with the mediums potential!

How has technology impacted upon the work you do?
Immensely amd positively in the way that the internet has opened up a plethora of artistic and creative communities and collectives to learn from, receive support, feedback and be inspired by.

What’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
Question everything, believe in no end to your creativity and always be yourself.

Where can we find you online?
I am around on facebook and twitter but for my main work, head over to tumblr: chasehotairballoons.tumblr.com or we make zines if you do trades.

What are you reading at the moment?
A zine about living an adventurous life on zero dollars a day!

What are you listenning to at the moment?
Bands of the Punk, Rock and Jazz persuasions (e.g. NOFX, Jaco Pastorious and Jimi Hendrix).

Anything else we should know?
I volunteer at Sticky Institute, Melbourne’s shop for zine crusaders and DIY enthusiasts, a brilliant and fun group of people.

Michael Peck

Posted in interviews, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on April 4, 2013 by intoviews

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what is your name?

Michael Peck.

how would you describe what you do?

Think about writing, read, think about writing, research, consider writing, read, research, think about writing. Afterwards, ideally, I
write.

what are you currently working on?

A novella about utopianism, some short stories, an essay on an Orson Welles film.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I often wonder about that. A little bit of everything, I suppose. A.B. in particular. Music, especially Tom Waits, Schubert and Bach. And also Flaubert, Melville, David Lynch, Edward Hopper, Goya, hardboiled dialog, mineral water, fountain pens, weird motel rooms, Wyoming at midnight, Portland just before sunrise, quantum physics, the Marx Brothers and a good thunderstorm. Yes, a little
bit of everything.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

You’d have to ask someone who is familiar with me or my work.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

There are no constraints in terms of what can or cannot be written or how a storyline progresses; the range of style and expression is unbounded by anything tangible. I think this is also the central weakness of writing, insofar as this endless stream of possibilities makes perfection impossible. But this is true of any medium.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

It has streamlined information-gathering, editing and procrastination.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

From Raymond Chandler: “Write or nothing.”

where can we find you online?

At believermag.com, the2ndhand.com, bibliostyle.wordpress.com, LA Review of Books.

what are you reading at the moment?

The Red and the Black, some Barthes, the aphorisms of Lichtenberg, a history of pulp fiction cover art.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Charles Mingus.

anything else we should know?

I can’t think of anything at the moment.

Karen Jones

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , on April 3, 2013 by intoviews

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what is your name?

Karen Jones

how would you describe what you do?
I write stories. For the most part short stories, though I have written two novels. The first has to be in the running for ‘worst book ever written’ – it should be used to teach people how not to write. It’s truly awful. The second never got past first draft. I used to write a lot of flash fiction and micro-fiction but, for no reason I can think of, that doesn’t appeal to me so much now.
what are you currently working on?
I always have several short stories at one stage or another. At the moment I have two at the planning stage, one almost completed, one in rewrite and one in final edit. I’m also working on something longer but I don’t know exactly what it will be yet. It may turn out to be a novel or a novella – or it may get slashed to pieces and end up as a haiku.
what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Reading. Seeing how it’s done by the greats.

Art. I used to spend a lot of time in Kelvingrove Art Galleries, getting story ideas from the paintings, people watching for characters, gathering conversation snippets, enjoying the quiet stillness of the place (except when there’s a school party dashing about pointing and sniggering at the paintings of nudes).
Music. A line in a song can spark a whole story, or just the mood of the music can influence how a piece will go.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
About me – that I’m lazy. I’ve heard it so often that I end up believing it. About my work – that if I can do it, it must be easy.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
You have such freedom with writing – anything goes, there are so many genres, so many forms, and you can do it anywhere. You don’t even have to physically write things down; you can be writing in your head and no one around you knows. Everywhere you go, everyone you meet can trigger stories, or single lines, or a poem.
Weaknesses It’s a solitary activity, so it’s easy to become disillusioned and disheartened. Sometimes, when inspiration is lacking, panic can set in and you convince yourself you’ll never write another word.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
My handwriting is atrocious, so using a netbook has made a huge difference. I can write anywhere and can understand what I’ve written when I look back on it later. My phone has also become a great asset. I use the memo function constantly. No more scribbled notes on pieces of paper that are frustratingly indecipherable when I gather them together to turn them into a story. That’s especially true of night time notes. I used to wake up in the morning and look at what I’d scrawled in the middle of the night and have no idea what was written there. Granted, even with phone, I still sometimes wonder what the hell I was thinking. One memo just said, “Something bad happened.” Excellent – someone alert The Booker Prize – I think I have a winning idea here.

The internet has brought ezines – new publishing outlets are always welcome. And, of course, it has also made self-publishing easier but I tend to see that as a double-edged sword.

On the downside, I do faff about on the internet far too often. A tiny piece of research can turn into hours in a Google maze where every new search seems to throw up bizarre or fascinating information that draws me in until I’ve completely lost the thread that would lead me back to my story. I’m very easily distracted.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
My favourite is one of Elmore Leonard’s If it sounds like writing, rewrite it
And from John Steinbeck If you are using dialogue, say it aloud as you write. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
where can we find you online
I’m not very good at self-promotion and having an online presence. I’m on Facebook, occasionally on Twitter and I started a blog but could never really get into it the way some people do, so it’s been gathering dust for over a year now. You can read some of my published work at these places
httpwww.mslexia.co.ukmagazinenewwritingnwstory3_45.php
httpwaterhousereview.wordpress.comcurrent-issue-2#JONES
httpwww.everydaypoets.comherbal-memory-by-karen-jones

what are you reading at the moment?
Room by Emma Donoghue. I’ve just started it but it has me completely hooked. I love when that happens and it’s becoming increasingly rare.

what are you listening to at the moment?
The very noisy fan my netbook sits on, commentary from a football match coming from the TV in another room and how loud my nails are on this keyboard. Must cut nails.
anything else we should know?
I always like to have at least six pieces of work submitted to competitions, publications at any one time. I need to have a goal to work to, otherwise I really would become lazy.
I love salsa dancing. That has absolutely nothing to do with my writing – I just love it and think everyone should do it for health and happiness.

Jesse Glass

Posted in interviews, news, plays, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , on April 2, 2013 by intoviews

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how would you describe what you do?

I write poetry, drama, fiction, essays, translations, libretti, paint, draw, engrave, make prints, artist books, visual poetry, sing sound poetry/ do performance/conceptual art (now primarily on the net, but in public venues in the 80’s). I have a puppet theater in Japan. I’ve been doing most of this work since I was 16 years old in the late 60’s because I knew early on that somebody had to do it. I’ve currently lived for more than 20 years in Japan.

what are you currently working on?

Right at this moment: Steinesque Facebook process poetry, which I’ve defined as a form of Experiential Haptic Modeling.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I’ll change that to who: Jenny Holzer for the Facebook stuff. William Blake for just about everything else, but there are scads of others. Joseph Beuys.
what is the greatest misconception(s) about you or your work?

Legion, and they’re all wrong.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

The main strength of paper, canvas and other physical materials is that they are easier to conserve than electronic files. Without constant applications of energy the electronic work pisses away. into oblivion: It’s a bit like carving text and image on the side of a soap bubble.
how has technology had an impact on the work you do?

I don’t swallow the whole bit about computers being the next step in anyone’s revo/evolution and I think that those who mindlessly dish out for up-dates and new versions of “ziz wiz and biz” are in thrall to corporations and hooked on the “freedom” that corporations offer—(I mean the “hey kidz, buy this new car and FEEL FREE in the USA cod-fish hype.) I don’t believe that science has the answer to everything, and I don’t go whoring after it in the manner of so many involved in the humanities. Look at the state of current Philosophy. It’s an embarrassment. Having said all of that, let me add that New technology is a useful tool right alongside the pencil and paper (which at one time was the New Technology), but I refuse to vacate my mind in order to block out the increasingly fucked-up world with anybody’s bought and sold static or to give up whatever personal freedom I have for on-line communities of “Borgist” fascists. Moreover, no amount of gadgetry will give anyone a short-cut to mastery of their chosen art no matter what the wrapper on the box says.
what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Be reckless. Don’t look back. Fuck any kind of nostalgia unless you can snowboard on it. Piss on organized religion. Feel free to hate as well as to love.
where can we find you online?

Look.
what are you reading at the moment?

Everything.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Berg, Schoenberg.

anything else we should know?

If anyone calls you “creative” don’t just be offended–punch them. That term is so fucking demeaning that even businessmen have glommed on to it. Buy my books.

I’m all over the place on the net. I guess UBU-Web and Penn-Sound and Jacket are the best places to find what i do, but there are others.

Billie Sue Mosiman

Posted in interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , on February 12, 2013 by intoviews

 

 

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what is your name?

Billie Sue Mosiman

how would you describe what you do?

I write fiction, both novels and short stories. I published 13 novels through traditional publishers beginning in 1984. I placed more than 150 short stories in various anthologies and magazines. I have more than 50 titles in digital form for the Kindle. I was nominated for both an Edgar and a Stoker for two of my novels. I write.

what are you currently working on?

I’m working on the second book of a trilogy and the title is LOSTNESS.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Reading. And continuing evidence of how one disturbed man or woman can influence the people around him.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

That I might take bullshit off anyone. That I write to fulfil some emptiness or pain in myself. I write to know what I think.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

The strength is that fiction books have lasting value. Especially today with digital, a book can last longer than ever. There’s also strength in being able to enter a reader’s imagination and stir a world to life. The weakness of writing is how no matter how you might struggle with the words to bring the fictional world alive, sometimes you fail. The distance between what is in the writer’s head and what he wants to create is a wide gulf to cross.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

It’s impacted it tremendously. I first worked on an electric typewriter. I had to make a copy with carbon paper rolled into the carriage. If I made a mistake, I had to use White-Out to correct it and if I made more than one or two typing mistakes on one page, I had to rip it up and retype the whole page. Then I got my first computer in 1983 and I could put a floppy disk in the slot to power up a word processor, slip another disk into the slot to use for saving the work to, and viola! I could make changes, do revisions and corrections right on a screen without having to rip up physical typing paper! Then Windows came along and word processing became even easier and more convenient. I went from mailing manuscripts to my publishers to emailing them the file. Today I can read books on a smart phone, an iPad, or my computer. I can see my older published titles put into digital form for ereaders and reach whole new audiences. I love these tech advances and I’m so happy to be able to create more comfortably and with greater ease.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Be honest in your work. If it hurts to write it, maybe you’re getting close to the nub of it. Don’t pretend to feel an emotion through your character, actually feel it. Trust in the fact humanity is more alike than unalike and every man and woman feels some of the same emotions and outrages you feel.

where can we find you online?

I have a blog at http://www.peculiarwriter.blogspot.com where this month I began to publish my memoir serially online. I’m on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/billie.s.mosiman) regularly and on Twitter (@billiemosiman). My work is mainly on the Kindle site. http://www.amazon.com/Billie-Sue-Mosiman/e/B000AQ0Z5E

 

what are you reading at the moment?

11/22/63 by Steve King and some HWA works that have made the preliminary ballot for the Stoker.

what are you listening to at the moment?

The news on CBS. Often I listen to my iPod and the thousands of songs I’ve taken off my CDs I gathered over the years.

anything else we should know?

I just published one of my novels originally published by Pocket Books and retitled it MOON LAKE. As I began work on the formatting for the digital file, I decided the straight suspense story lacked a supernatural creature–so I created one and let it crawl through the book, changing the story somewhat and giving it a supernatural element. I’m posting my memoir, ALABAMA GIRL, on my blog at about a chapter a week. I’m writing the second book of a trilogy about fallen angels. The first book is BANISHED and has been out a year. The second one is titled LOSTNESS and I should complete it this year. My novel, BAD TRIP SOUTH, has been optioned by a producer for a feature movie.

Victoria Mosley

Posted in interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on February 6, 2013 by intoviews

Vic Writing

what is your name?

Victoria Mosley

how would you describe what you do?

I’m a poet and novelist

what are you currently working on?

My 10th novel

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

My life

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

N/A

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

I work with words and music sometimes and ideas of all kinds ,,,,,,,,,,,I don’t see things in terms of strengths or weaknesses, I see my writing as a gift and I am happiest when writing .

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Made research easier / made it easier for people to access my poetry

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Never give up and keep a journal write every day. Use the whole of life as inspiration and all the five senses

where can we find you online?

victoriamosley.com ………on google ………on FB ………twitter…………Amazon for my books

what are you reading at the moment?

Sebastian Faulks

what are you listening to at the moment?

Zero 7

anything else we should know?

No

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