Archive for comics

Dustin Weaver

Posted in art, comics, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , , on April 6, 2013 by intoviews

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what is your name?

My name is Dustin Paul Weaver.

how would you describe what you do?

I draw comic books, which is comparable to being a film director, I think. Like a director, a comic artist works from a script and
determines how to tell this story in a visual medium. The big difference is that where a director brings in a lot of other people–
actors, cinematographer, story boarders, set designers, etc.– a comic book artist does most of it alone. I’m the set designer, the costume designer, and all of the actors, and I’m choosing the shots, handling the lighting, and doing all the special effects.

On top off all that, a comic book artist can employ techniques used in painting and illustration, from the abstract to the realistic, to
create something visually engaging.

what are you currently working on?

I’m currently the cover artist on Avengers for Marvel comics, and I’m working on a 3-issue story arc that will be published in Avengers
#7-9.

In my “spare time” I’m slowly chipping away at a comic that I am writing and drawing. I’m planning on releasing it for free online, in
weekly installments starting ether in the summer or fall of 2013.
what has had the greatest influence on your work?

The greatest influence on my work is my friendship with fellow comic book creator, D.J. Bryant. He’s a very smart guy with good taste. Many of the books that I’ve really loved and been inspired by I’ve read at his recommendation. And when I’m creating something, whether or not I think it’s something D.J. would like is something I think about.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Maybe it’s that I LIKE drawing buildings or that I LIKE drawing a lot of detail. I don’t “like” drawing these things so much as I like drawings OF these things. If you think drawing hundreds of little windows on buildings is fun for anyone, you’re mistaken. But when the
result is a fully realized city-scape, or a car engine, or what ever else has a lot of detail, and it comes out just as you imagined it,
the reward of having done it is great. I’m just trying to create something that I would like. Most of the time doing that is hard work.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Comic books are visual. They can grab a reader’s attention and provide a similar accessibility to that of movies and TV. But, going back to the first question, unlike movies and TV, comic books are created by a very small group of people and in many cases just one person. In this way they are more like literature in that there is a lot of creative freedom.

Comics also have the ability to use the strengths of both images and words, which makes them a powerful storytelling medium.
I think the biggest weakness this medium has is that the perception most people have of what comic books are and what they can be is still limited to the super-hero genre. Comic books can tell any kind of story. It needs the general audience to recognize that and be open to it before it can really take off. If you’ve never read a comic (or graphic novel– same thing) because you’re not interested in
super-heroes, maybe look a little deeper. I love comics. I’m almost always reading one, and it’s almost never a super-hero comic. (That
isn’t a slam on super-hero comics.)

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I guess I like doing things traditionally. I don’t use any 3d modelling or figure posing programs, and I don’t think I ever will. I
don’t do much digital drawing ether, though I’m not opposed to using digital tools and media for creating an image. I do do some clean up to my work in Photoshop but that’s about it.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

I struggle with the idea of giving advice. I think good advice for one person might not be good for another. If I imagine that I am giving
advice to myself, say ten years ago, I would say: Do things the way you want to do them. If someone tells you this is how to make comics and this is how to have a successful career, don’t listen. Don’t compare your work or your career to anyone else’s just because you think they must be doing it the right way. There is no right way, and everyone has their own trajectory. Like what you like. Do things the way you want to do them, and try to do them really really well.

Again, I don’t think this advice is for everyone.
where can we find you online?

I have a blog at http://dustinweaver.blogspot.com

And if you want to see my art but don’t want to read my rambling stupidity, I have a tumblr at http://dustinweaver.tumblr.com/

what are you reading at the moment?

I’m reading the first Jaime Hernandez Love and Rockets book, “Maggie the Mechanic”. So many people love this stuff, I figured it was time I found out what all the fuss is about. I’m not that far into it. I’m excited to see how it evolves.

I’m also reading Kafka’s “The Castle” and I’m loving it. Very inspiring.

I recently finished Osamu Tezuka’s “Barbara” and I really enjoyed it. He’s the best.

I’m getting Brandon Graham’s “Multiple Warheads” and James Stokoe’s “Godzilla- The Half-Century War” whenever a new issue comes out.

Oh and this may seem silly, but I’m reading the manga version of “Return Of The Jedi” by Shin-Ichi Hiromoto. It’s just an adaptation of
the film, but the things Hiromoto does with page layouts are so great. He puts so much drama and life and FUN into it. This is work not to be dismissed.

what are you listening to at the moment?

The albums that I have in heavy rotation right now are Blonde Redhead’s “23”, Brian Eno’s “Before And After Science”, Broadcast’s
“The Future Crayon”, Crystal Stilts’ “Alight of Night”, David Bowie’s “Low”, Ennio Morricone’s soundtrack to “Il Grande Silenzio”, and the
latest Guided By Voices album (I think. I can hardly keep up with Pollard’s productivity.)

anything else we should know?

I can’t think of anything.

Juan Santapau

Posted in update with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 5, 2010 by intoviews

juan santapau

juan santapau

how would you describe what you do?

Comics, short tales in comic form, under the name “The Secret Knots“. I think of The Secret Knots as an online, growing book of tales. I’ve also described it as “slow motion soap opera”

what are you currently working on?

A comic about the brother of a famous and influential writer of the past who gets obsessed with his brother’s persona. It adds to this other comic called Music and Pie in a series of biographical comics about fictitious characters.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Reading a lot of Borges and Cortázar probably, the notion of literature as means and end at the same time. Impressionistic depiction of emotions and reactions in some Japanese novels. Neil Gaiman’s comics and books. The work of many artists I’ve met in the Internet, countless illustrators, particularly the color in the work of bande desinée artist Bengal. The online comic A Softer World which was a big inspiration to start doing webcomics.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

I wouldn’t say misconceptions, but often I leave room for interpretation and it’s always interesting to see how some readers really get away with their ideas to unexpected places sometimes. I enjoy it and don’t feel the need to “clarify” anything, I don’t think there’s much to clarify in these cases.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Comics are a fascinating medium for storytelling. Telling stories and transmitting ideas through images and words seems natural, almost like the obvious way to do it. I like the way comics let the pacing and the rhythm of the story work in a consensus between the object and the viewer.

Weaknesses? It may be a slow medium to work with, depending on the kind of illustration.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Posting comics on the Internet has certain specific effects, like immediate feedback, the chance to reach ‘casual’ viewers who get to your site through portals like stumbleupon or reddit; the screen reading also determines technical aspects like page layout, font sizes and such. But probably more interesting than that is that certain topics or genres seem to benefit specially from the online transmission: journal comics, brief stories, niche topics. Poetry. Experimental fiction.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

I read somewhere that Grant Morrison said something along the lines of “dont be close-fisted with your ideas.” Use them, do not save them for later, for the great saga, play or movie that you expect to make someday. Use your ideas and trust that more will come. If you read Morrison’s Doom Patrol you know exactly what that means, every page seems filled with such high concepts, over the top ideas and bizarre characters. It’s an electrical read, a synaptic show.

where can we find you online?

The Secret Knots is www.thesecretknots.com

I’ve got a Livejournal at santapau.livejournal.com
And I notify of new comics in twitter with the user name santapau.

what are you reading at the moment?

Finishing Jonathan Carroll’s “The Wooden Sea” and starting Sandor Marai’s “Embers”; a chronological compilation of gothic tales about vampires, a compilation of tales inspired by Michael Moorcock’s multiverse. Several online comics.

what are you listening to at the moment?

Recently: Dif Juz, Atlas Sound, Auburn Lull, David Sylvian, Royksopp, The Knife, Fever Ray, Brian Eno, Asobi Seksu, Lycia, Black tape for a Blue Girl, Spacemen 3 and Ulrich Schnauss. Also Zola Jesus and Pyramids with Nadja, both recommendations from Warren Ellis’ blog.

anything else we should know?

Yes. Recently there was this huge earthquake in my country, Chile. If you’d like to help, there’s this google link: http://www.google.com/relief/chileearthquake/

and probably there’s a local Red Cross near you that may be receiving support.

joe matt

Posted in comics, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2010 by intoviews

joe matt

joe matt

what is your name?
Joe Matt.

how would you describe what you do?
Autobiographical comic books.

what are you currently working on?
A book about the last 6 years of my life, since moving from Toronto to LA.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?
Maus and the autobiographical work of Robert Crumb.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?
That I’m lazy and/or a creep. Also, I think many people have the misconception that making comics is easy. Good comics, that is.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
The main strength of comics is control. The cartoonist controls everything and the challenges can be overwhelming.
And I don’t think the medium has any weaknesses, other than the limits of language and communication.
Also, a weakness of comics may be its perception as a juvenile medium, but I consider that more a failing of people, as opposed to the medium. The same can be said for The Academy Awards looking down at comedies. It’s snobbery, plain and simple.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?
I’ve chosen to ignore computers completely, as far as producing comic pages goes. Ink on paper is the only road I want to travel on.
From a publisher’s point of view though, I’m certain computers are an invaluable aid. So, I’m grateful for that.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
From a technical standpoint, my advice on comics could fill a book.
But basically, it might boil down to simply: dig as deep as you can.
My second piece of advice to all cartoonists would be: study the masters!
We’re extremely fortunate to be living in a Golden Age of comic strip reprints. And I urge EVERYONE to support such fine projects as: Walt & Skeezix, Little Orphan Annie, Popeye, Dick Tracy, Peanuts, Captain Easy, as well as countless others.

where can we find you online?
Friends can find me on Facebook; everyone else on MySpace.
Also, I don’t have the Internet at home, so my emailing is sparse.

what are you reading at the moment?
Conversations with Art Spiegelman

what are you listening to at the moment?
THE BEST SHOW ON WFMU!!! Hosted by Tom Sharpling!!
A friend burns mp3 discs for me from the archives at: www.friendsoftom.com

anything else we should know?
I am actually working, believe it or not.
Also, please buy my books. Comics are my sole source of income and I’m DYING out here in LA!
Today, I spent a whole $1.10 on a small coffee. And that was it.
I did, however, manage to drop $80 the day before on two volumes of DICK TRACY. So, don’t worry…my priorities are still in order.
SO LONG, SUCKERS!!! ~Joe

David Randall Curtis

Posted in comics, interviews, news, poetry, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2010 by intoviews

David Randall Curtis

David Randall Curtis

what is your name?
David Randall Curtis

how would you describe what you do?

Writing poetry, performing Spoken Word and writing/drawing comics.

what are you currently working on?

Having a comic of mine called “Krinkle” animated for YouTube.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Stanley Kubrick—his work made me look at art differently.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

That all the poems are completely, 100% literal.
what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?
The strength of poetry is the people that “get it” are usually educated and loyal. The weakness is most people don’t care about poetry.


how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I had to learn how to deliver poems differently for the camera.


what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Always be careful when giving advice—someone might actually take it.

where can we find you online?
YouTube Channel:  DavidRandallCurtis
FaceBook:  David Randall Curtis
Twitter:  DRCpoetry
My poetry book with 2 DVDs:  http://www.filmbaby.com/films/4408

what are you reading at the moment?

“Paradoxia” by Lydia Lunch.


what are you listening to at the moment?

My friend Mary Cigarettes.  He can be found on YouTube under that name.


anything else we should know?

Yes, check out these artists on youtube:  KarinFredrika (singer/songwriter), TinySpectacle (poet),

Janeczka (poet/singer), TwoHawksFucking (poet), 1Aware1 (poet), MsWriteNow (poet), WetlandsRemediation (poet) and SamDougKen (poet)

Andre Navarro

Posted in comics, film, interviews, news, update, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2010 by intoviews
Andre Navarro

Andre Navarro

what is your name?

André Silva Navarro.

how would you describe what you do?

I try to be versatile. “Writer” doesn’t really cover it, because I also draw and animate in Flash. “Storyteller” brings to mind the image of a creepy old man at a campfire narrating scary tales to a bunch of kids before picking one to rape. Please note that when I said “brings to mind” I meant MY mind, which, as you’ll notice throughout this interview, doesn’t tend to think of nice things very often. I think “narrative artist” works, though — I write fiction, I draw a webcomic and the covers to my own fiction when I publish them on http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/“, I make flash animations and, as a hobby, I also review works in three narrative mediums: comics, movies and games. I might start adding novels to that when I find enough time to read them regularly, since I’ve been so busy I feel like this whole “24-hour-day” thing is a bullshit myth.

what are you currently working on?

Active projects: I’m writing a sci-fi novel called “Ares”, currently 23.000 words into the second draft. It’s about the construction of a large spaceship, ARES, in Earth’s orbit and the seven astronauts who find themselves in a desperate situation during its second mission. It’s currently my main project, requiring loads of research and thorough revision. Tough, but satisfying — well, not that satisfying yet, but hopefully it will be. If I keep a regular work schedule it should be published in Print-On-Demand and E-Book formats after February. All I know is that it won’t be finished BEFORE February. It’s been in the works for a year and a half — hell, perhaps two. The other project, aside from mantaining http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/ , is writing fiction regularly, mainly for http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/, which has recently received an extreme makeover and is looking gorgeous. Projects for the future: a noir graphic novel with the provisional title of “Morris” (to be changed due to its similarity to “Ares”, which is a final title) about an LAPD detective in the near future who had his life drained by a two-year long case which, as the icing on top of a shit cake, results in a terrible personal catastrophe that pushes him over the edge. Artwork will be stark black and white provided by me. A flash animation to the sound of Goldfrapp’s superb song, “Utopia” — which will require the most meticulous and difficult animation process I’ve ever tried. And there’s a shitload of other things waiting as well, but that’s enough for now, as they’re so many that if I try listing them I’ll start crying again.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

I think the person who kick-started me on the general direction of art was Charles Chaplin. When I was fourteen or fifteen, my father showed me one of his movies on a TV channel, and I found it hilarious (his second film, Kids Auto Race At Venice). I sought the rest of his work and fell in love with it. Furthermore, the consistently amazing work of my favorite writer, Garth Ennis, as well as movies like “Carlito’s Way”, cemented my love for narrative arts and my wish to create them. There’s a bunch of other influences — Warren Ellis, Alan Moore, Chan-Wook Park, Bill Hicks and so forth. I try to extract a lesson from anything, even — perhaps especially — when it’s a “how NOT to do it” kind of lesson, like when I’m watching a Paul W. S. Anderson film.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

About my work, I’m not aware of any. About me, some people complain I’m negative and pessimistic — which I am, but I exaggerate it online to have a sense of humor about myself. In real life I’m amiable and smile (way too) often.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

For publishing fiction on the Internet — easy to get readers, hard to keep them. The constant flux of information on the web keeps your attention diverted, making it hard to concentrate — I mean, I have about thirteen tabs open right now — but it’s much easier to expose your work to a relatively large audience (as in, someone other than your mom). For writing a novel — it’s gratifying to build something so complete, so full of information, detail and with more than enough space to develop characters — it’s also very tiring and occasionally frustrating to think of enough subplots for the book and come up with good enough reasons for their existence so they won’t be mere filler. It has to be thoroughly planned, and it’s so easy to miss something during revision and end up with a huge plothole or inconsistency. For drawing a webcomic — excellent outlet for my dark sense of humor and the format I chose allows for fairly quick production — but coming up with something worth making a joke about is always a challenge, which is why I always keep five or six strips ready in advance. I’m very afraid of authoring one of those comedy webcomics that forget the punchline, replacing it for pseudo-witty dialogue or falling into repetition. For animating in Flash — creating something like a flash animation from scratch is immensely gratifying — it also requires immense amounts of patience, and I always had ideas for flash animations I couldn’t follow through with because I don’t have access to a team of voiceover actors. I’m thinking of ways around that.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

Hugely – meeting people for collaborative projects, self-publishing, quick research, animating, drawing, all more possible as technology advances. I’ve had it easy — being nineteen years old, I started doing this when the Internet already existed.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

Don’t lie to an artist. Don’t tell him his work is good if you don’t think so to make him feel better, because ultimately you’re fucking him over. Be honest but constructive. And if you’re an artist, ask the same, but be mindful of who’s giving you the advice — if the person uses “LOL” a lot and commits too many grammar mistakes in a single sentence, don’t feel bad if he doesn’t consider your latest project a masterpiece (but if he does you’ll feel good anyway, won’t you?). And if you get a lot of praise, cheer up but don’t believe the hype. Always doubt your own work. Be your own worst enemy regarding criticism. It hurts, but it helps you evolve.

where can we find you online?

My website contains all my work, either in it or linking to it. Check the Categories column, where I’ve organised pretty much everything on the site as neatly as I could:

http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/

And for everything else (Twitter, e-mail, flash animations, Flickr) check this section of the website: http://andrenavarro.wordpress.com/about/

Also, http://www.weaponizer.co.uk/oneauthor.php?id=26 profile on Weaponizer

what are you reading at the moment?

“The Physician”, by Noah Gordon. Well-researched and good characters, although the prose is a bit basic and uninspired. Also badly-translated — the mistakes start on the damn title, “O Físico”, which in Portuguese means “The Physicist”. I’m always reading comics — I don’t like superheroes, so I’m inclined to writers like Garth Ennis and Warren Ellis. Also a lot of research for “Ares”.

what are you listening to at the moment?

When I started answering this interview, “Sad Connections” — a gorgeous piece from the “Sympathy For Lady Vengeance” soundtrack. Also listening to the soundtrack of “Oldboy” (one of my favorite soundtracks of one of my favorite films). I’ve recently become a fan of Goldfrapp and I’ve been enjoying Electric Six. The terrible “The Princess And The Frog” gave me an urge to listen to the soundtrack of some Disney films which are actually good, by masters like Alan Menken and Hans Zimmer.

anything else we should know?

When that picture was taken, I had just shaved most of my beard, took the pic, and shaved the rest. I don’t actually have a moustache, although some people insist shaving it off was a bad idea, and others are still on their knees in gratitude to Heaven that I didn’t keep it.

Alberto J. Silva

Posted in comics, interviews, news, update with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2010 by intoviews

Alberto J. Silva

Alberto J. Silva

what is your name?

Hi, my name is Alberto J. Silva (the J. stands for Jorge) How’s It going?

how would you describe what you do?

Somebody said I’m someone who draws things. That’s fine for me. I draw things.

what are you currently working on?

I just released “Superwolf”, a print on demand comic book, and I’m also finishing the newest bulk update for my webcomics site “Steel Raining”, which is in fact a collection of short stories. Then there’s this project I’ve been working on for the last few years that I’d like to finish once and for all. I’m only 8 pages away from the end, so I think 2010 could be the year. I’ve also been really interested in alternate reality and cross-platform narrative lately. That’s a field I’d like to explore in the future.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Too many names to mention (since I seem to have a different favorite artist every month), but generally speaking, I suppose It’s been the works of the big and better known professionals in the comic-book medium. Also, I don’t have myself as a nostalgic guy, but most of the stuff that had an impact on me while I was a kid has stayed there as a reference.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

Some people out there think my comics are the work of a collective of some kind. I’m sorry but It’s just me. I do all the work. For better or worse.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Comics are -or they used to be- cheap. Cheap to buy, but also cheap to produce. All you have to do is find your idea and grab a pencil. They’re the visual communication of the broke, the youth and the kids. On the other hand, comics are more sophisticated now. That’s fine, but I hate It when comics (printed or digital) become accommodating or take themselves too seriously.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

I think the biggest impact has been on exposure and distribution. Ten years ago I used to print my comics on photocopies and they didn’t get past the doors of my high school. But today, anyone who has an Internet terminal can access my content. It’s also a lot easier to contact other professionals, publishers or editors, looking for quality feedback or even some work. As for the artwork Itself, I do a lot of my work inside the computer now because It’s cleaner and cheaper. However, I still like to start with a pencil doodle and some paper. I think the best results come from mixing digital and traditional tools.

what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?

I’m not much for giving advice, but “never be afraid to try something different” could be a good one.

where can we find you online?

There’s my webcomics site: http://www.steelraining.albertosilva.es/

http://pencilinpain.deviantart.com/ is an online gallery

http://www.kekorto.es/ is the place where I hang out with my friends.

what are you reading at the moment?

I just finished Susanna Clarke’s “Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell” and I’m also getting near the end of Ray Loriga’s “Tokyo Doesn’t Love us Anymore”.

what are you listening to at the moment?

David Guetta, Phoenix, Tom Jones, Boney-M and Daft Punk are all in my playlist at the moment.

anything else we should know?

You probably noticed English isn’t my birth language. I’m Spanish, so I’m sorry for any mistakes I made.

David Bishop

Posted in update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 30, 2009 by intoviews
David Bishop

David Bishop

what is your name?
David Bishop


how would you describe what you do?
I’m a writer. I’m also a part-time lecturer in creative writing at Edinburgh Napier University in Scotland, but first and foremost I’m a writer.

what are you currently working on?
I’m focusing my energies on screenwriting, specifically TV work. I write for the BBC medical drama series Doctors, and I’m developing projects for several independent production companies. I read scripts for Scottish Screen, and also write comics scripts for a character called the Phantom [a.k.a. The Ghost Who Walks], which appear in five or six different languages worldwide – but not in the UK. Various other bits and bobs, but those are the headlines.

what has had the greatest influence on your work?

Blimey, what a question! I guess reading and watching, closely followed by my experience as a journalist. I read a lot growing up, and discovered a love of pithy, fast-paced prose that still infects my work [purple prose is kryptonite to me]. I spent much of my childhood glued to the TV, developing an enduring passion for small screen storytelling. And my journalism training taught me not to be afraid of learning or asking questions – good skills for any writer.

what is the greatest misconception about you or your work?

I’m not sure there are any great misconceptions about me or my work. If they do exist, there’s not much I can do about them except strive to improve. You can drive yourself crazy worry what others think or feel about your work. Far better to take responsibility for what you do – validate yourself, don’t live or die by the opinions of others.

what do you see as the main strengths and weaknesses of the medium you work in?

Film is like a one-night stand, but TV drama is a relationship – much harder to develop and sustain, but far more rewarding over time. It can tell truths about our lives and the world around us. TV drama can dig far deeper into characters and their stories than any film. But it can also be lazy, slipshod and – worst of all – boring. TV drama with nothing to say is like eating Ryvita for every meal of the day – filling, but flavourless.

how has technology impacted upon the work you do?

New technology is revolutionising the means of production and distribution. Low cost HD cameras and editing software mean anyone can make a movie or a web drama, but that’s no guarantee of quality. Email and the web make research much easier, but also encourage laziness. If you want to build real relationships or discover truths, you’ll find them out in the world – not on your computer screen. The ability to tell a good story well always triumphs in the long run, no matter how technology affects a medium. It’s execution that counts, not the method by which a story reaches you.


what’s the greatest piece of advice you would like to pass on?
I was given this piece of advice by Edinburgh writer-director Adrian Mead and I happily pass it on to you: TALENT + EFFORT + STRATEGY = SUCCESS. The more of each element you bring to the equation, the greater the results.

where can we find you online?

Visit my blog at http://viciousimagery.blogspot.com

what are you reading at the moment?

Just finished “Hello,” Lied The Agent by Ian Gurvitz, a scathingly honest memoir by a Hollywood TV writer. Halfway through The City & The City by China Mieville, a genre-bending SF crime thriller novel. And I’ve been staring at a photographic novel called Asylum: Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals by Christopher Payne – gorgeous yet haunting.

what are you listening to at the moment?

New Zealand funk noir outfit Dimmer [particularly their first album, I Believe You Are a Star]; the austere yet heart-breaking collaboration The Glare by David McAlmont and Michael Nyman; and some trippy lovers’ dubrock on Me’Shell Ndegeocello’s glorious Comfort Woman.

anything else we should know?

Professionalism trumps gifted amateurs. Don’t burn bridges with the napalm of your own insecurities. And never, ever eat anything bigger than your head.